Part B


Also found in: Medical.

Part B Prospectus

A supplement to a mutual fund's prospectus. It contains additional information on the fund, usually on its risks and operations. Mutual funds do not provide the part B prospectus to investors automatically, as many investors do not believe they need it to make an appropriate decision on whether to buy shares in the fund. However, regulations require that a mutual fund provide a copy of its part B prospectus free of charge upon request. It is also called a statement of additional information.

Part B

References in periodicals archive ?
"Next year, we expect to see an increase of a little over 22% for Medicare Part B," says Ron Mastrogiovanni, president of HealthView Services (HVS), a provider of software that projects health care costs, in Danvers, Massachusetts.
The firm's research indicates that health care inflation, including for Part B, is expected to grow 6% annually for the next 10 years.
The penalty is 10% of the monthly premium for every full 12 months a beneficiary delayed his or her enrollment in Part B, and, once it's levied, it lasts the remainder of the beneficiary's life.
She will also pay an LEP on her monthly Part B premium equal to 10% of her current Part B premium for the rest of her life.
As a result, its enrollment rules are more relaxed than Part B's.
(A beneficiary can buy into Part A at a reduced rate if he or she had between 30 and 39 work credits.) For people buying into Part A, the enrollment rules are similar to Part B's with an IEP, SEP, and GEP.
Since current law requires that premiums for all beneficiaries must pay for 25% of Medicare Part B's cost, when there is no COLA, the higher-income group must pay the full 25% themselves.
Thousands of Medicare patients in each of the 50 states are acquainted with an APRN as a source of Part B services.
To compute these data one used to have to wait until well after the end of a calendar to identify all of the unique beneficiaries ever enrolled in Part B and all of the unique beneficiaries with respect to a particular set of services.
Across all Part B services, persons served per thousand elderly in 2010 was 988.
(Approximately 25 percent of Medicare eligibles are enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans and thus are not considered eligible for treatment under fee-for-service Medicare.) Over that time frame the total number of APRNs directly billing Part B carriers increased from about 82,000 to 100,000; persons served increased from 9 million to 10.4 million; and the persons served percentage increased from 26 percent to 28 percent to 30 percent.
The other form of tying originated in Representative Wilbur Mills's decision, as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, to tie the three then-competing health care bills together in one package, creating the three-part system (dubbed the "three-layer cake") that we know today as Medicare Part A, Medicare Part B, and Medicaid.