Paris


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Paris

A former slang term for the spot exchange rate for the U.S. dollar and the French franc.
References in classic literature ?
Goodworthy, "but we get our evenings to ourselves, and Paris is Paris." He smiled in a knowing way.
He asked the manager next morning what there was to be seen that was `thick.' He thoroughly enjoyed these visits of his to Paris; he said they kept you from growing rusty.
On the first day of that month our four companions had landed at Boulogne, and, in two parties, had set out for Paris. Toward the end of the fourth day of the journey Athos and Aramis reached Nanterre, which place they cautiously passed by on the outskirts, fearing that they might encounter some troop from the queen's army.
From that moment all traces of what was occurring in the streets of Paris were lost to us.
At last, as it grew towards dinner-time, 'Do you know Paris?' asked Van Tromp.
It has been mentioned that Rebecca, soon after her arrival in Paris, took a very smart and leading position in the society of that capital, and was welcomed at some of the most distinguished houses of the restored French nobility.
de Treville, confiding to him candidly the importance of his departure, when the news was transmitted to him as well as to his three friends that the king was about to set out for Paris with an escort of twenty Musketeers, and that they formed part of the escort.
But the Americans who choose this peculiar manner of seeing Paris must be actually just as bad.
"The day for the execution of the Turk was fixed, but on the night previous to it he quitted his prison and before morning was distant many leagues from Paris. Felix had procured passports in the name of his father, sister, and himself.
In Paris he is assailed by temptations of every kind.
"I have been in Paris. I spent years there," said Pierre.
The city found there all that is required for a city like Paris; a chapel in which to pray to God; a plaidoyer , or pleading room, in which to hold hearings, and to repel, at need, the King's people; and under the roof, an arsenac full of artillery.