panic buying

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Panic Buying

A situation in which many investors buy a security on high volume, leading to a rapid rise in price. Panic buying usually occurs when investors believe that a security or market is already rising and they wish to buy it before the price rises even more. Panic buying may or may not be the result of an overreaction. Rules on many stock markets limit the amount by which a security can rise in a single session to reduce the pressure for panic buying. See also: Panic selling.

panic buying

A flurry of security purchases accompanied by high volume and sharp price increases. During a period of panic buying, buyers do not have time to evaluate fundamental or technical factors because their primary goal is to acquire securities before the prices rise even more. For example, panic buying occurred on the day following President Lyndon B. Johnson's announcement of his decision not to run for reelection.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said he believes it was a sales drive to get fuel users to "panic buy".
Motorists were urged not to panic buy fuel as Unite said it wanted a negotiated settlement and stressed that it had not yet decided whether to name dates for action.
Unite did not release a statement confirming it was going to take industrial action but the situation across the country was such that mindless people started to panic buy, leaving those who actually needed the fuel to get to work completely unable to access any.
Tim Shallcross, head of policy in Wales for the Institute of Advance Motoring, said: "There is absolutely no need for anyone to panic buy.
It is ridiculous because there is no need to panic buy."
The union urged motorists not to panic buy, stressing it had not decided whether to name any strike dates, but it will have to name strike dates, or other forms of industrial action, by tomorrow afternoon unless employers agree to extend the deadline.
And fire chiefs took a more proactive approach, urging motorists not to panic buy or store fuel in unsuitable places because it could lead to fires.
Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude landed himself in trouble after suggesting that drivers should fill up any spare jerry cans with petrol and keep them in garages even though motoring organisations and energy firms have urged people not to panic buy.
He said: "There is no disruption to the fuel supply in the UK and members of the public should not panic buy. The actions of some motorists in queuing irresponsibly at petrol stations is causing danger to other road users.
I now plan my grocery shopping and don't get sidetracked by special offers on products or panic buy.
There were long queues at petrol stations as drivers ignored warnings not to panic buy.
Drivers are being urged not to panic buy petrol if Tesco fuel delivery drivers strike.