Pain and Suffering Damages

Pain and Suffering Damages

Money awarded to a plaintiff in a lawsuit to compensate for physical or mental distress associated with a claim. For example, a person injured in an automobile accident may sue for the cost of medical bills, lost income and an additional amount (determined by the plaintiff) for pain and suffering. While the plaintiff may request these damages, juries have a great deal of leeway in determining how much to award. Additionally, some jurisdictions place limits on the amount of pain and suffering damages.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress has since passed legislation that allows families of terrorism victims to seek pain and suffering damages.
Ohio Supreme Court Rules on Pain and Suffering Damages.
Thomas Vilsack, collecting pain and suffering damages for injuries sustained in a car accident while in the course of committing a felony will be prohibited.
Responsible citizens will no longer have to bear the cost of their insurance companies' paying for pain and suffering damages to someone who is injured while committing a crime or fleeing from one," said Joseph Termini, associate counsel for the National Association of Independent Insurers in Chicago.
Iowa's new legislation mirrors actions taken in other states, where similar "no pay/no play" provisions deny pain and suffering damages to drivers who do not have car insurance or are found to be driving while drunk or in the commission of a crime.
CLAIMANTS are recovering pre-impact pain and suffering damages in domestic aviation accidents governed by U.
4) the same court denied the defendants' motion to set aside the jury award of $10,000 for the decedent's pre-impact pain and suffering on the grounds that New York law provides a cause of action permitting plaintiffs to recover pain and suffering damages following injuries which result in death.
Because Section 573(c) of the California Probate Code specifically prohibits a personal representative from recovering damages for pain and suffering sustained prior to death, the defendant argued that pre-death pain and suffering damages were prohibited.
After analyzing each of these federal statutes, the court concluded that pain and suffering damages are compensable in cases governed by the Warsaw Convention.
The defendants sought to have Indiana law applied because Indiana's statute does not permit recovery for pain and suffering damages.
The petitioner further contends that because DOHSA is a wrongful death statute and contains no survival provision, she should be permitted to maintain a survival action for pre-death pain and suffering damages concurrently with a wrongful death action under DOHSA.
In addition to comments made in the letter, Dunmoyer adds: "SB 1237 circumvents Proposition 213, the initiative that was passed by 77% of the voters in 1996 which prevented uninsured motorists, drunk drivers and criminals from recovering pain and suffering damages.