Depression

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Depression

Period when excess aggregate supply overwhelms aggregate demand, resulting in falling prices, unemployment problems, and economic contraction.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Depression

A particularly long and/or deep recession. While there is no technical definition of a depression, conventionally it is defined as a period featuring severe declines in productivity and investment and particularly high unemployment. During the Great Depression, for example, GDP in the United States dropped 12% between 1929 and 1930 and a further 16% the following year. Likewise, unemployment rose to more than 25% nationwide and higher in some places.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Depression.

A depression is a severe and prolonged downturn in the economy. Prices fall, reducing purchasing power. There tends to be high unemployment, lower productivity, shrinking wages, and general economic pessimism.

Since the Great Depression following the stock market crash of 1929, the governments and central banks of industrialized countries have carefully monitored their economies. They adjust their economic policies to try to prevent another financial crisis of this magnitude.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

depression

see BUSINESS CYCLE.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

depression

a phase of the BUSINESS CYCLE characterized by a severe decline (slump) in the level of economic activity (ACTUAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). Real output and INVESTMENT are at very low levels and there is a high rate of UNEMPLOYMENT. A depression is caused mainly by a fall in AGGREGATE DEMAND and can be reversed provided that the authorities evoke expansionary FISCAL POLICY and MONETARY POLICY. See DEFLATIONARY GAP, DEMAND MANAGEMENT.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Farrow, "Systemic paraphenylenediamine (PPD) poisoning: a case report and review, "Human and Experimental Toxicology, vol.
De acordo com ela, a decisao de nao contratar PPD e, ao menos em alguns casos, uma decisao irracional, no sentido de nao se dever nem a baixa produtividade do candidato portador de deficiencia, nem a baixa produtividade media do grupo de PPD ao qual ele pertence.
PPD affects approximately one in nine women who have given birth in the US and 400,000 women annually.
Overall, the findings, published in the journal of Journal of Family Issues, complement previous studies on barriers for fathers suffering from PPD. Researchers said encountering a lack of information and stigma often causes dads to distance themselves from their child and has been associated with marital difficulties.
Massachusetts has a PPD program that leverages care providers, psychiatric screenings, and community resources.
Medical conditions that mimic PPD include anemia, thyroid disease, hypoactive delirium, infections, and alcohol/substance use disorder.
Apart from regular hair dyeing, human exposure to PPD may occur during tattooing or inhalation in case of industrial workers.
An update of the ACOG committee opinion also states, "It is recommended that all obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care providers complete a full assessment of mood and emotional well-being (including screening for PPD and anxiety with a validated instrument) during the comprehensive postpartum visit for each patient." This is recommended in addition to any screening for depression and anxiety during the pregnancy.
Last New Year's Eve, the PPD rapid-fire tweeted her resolutions between 11:56 and 11:59:
Shockingly, three quarters of people surveyed were not aware that black henna tattoos contain PPD and that when it's used on the skin it can be dangerous.
Dr Anjali Mahto, Consultant Dermatologist and British Skin Foundation spokesperson adds: "It's worrying to see that the public just don't realise the danger PPD can pose when it is used on the skin.
He made the remarks at the third session of the Public-Private Dialogue (PPD) Council, organised by the Investment Climate Reform Unit (ICRU), Planning and Development Department on Wednesday.