Owner


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Owner

One who has the exclusive right to use and abuse property within the limits of the law. For example, if one owns land, the owner may use it to build a house, start a farm or dump toxic waste, subject to zoning, environmental and other applicable laws. The ability of an individual to own something is the foundation of the free market system.
References in classic literature ?
"And why should he not have this?" asked the owner; "he is young, it is true, but he seems to me a thorough seaman, and of full experience."
"Pardieu, and that is true!" cried the owner, greatly delighted.
"Dantes has done his," replied the owner, "and that is not saying much.
This was so, however, not because my owners were especially cruel, for they were not, as compared with many others.
And so saying he gave Rocinante the spur, and Sancho followed him on foot and loaded, and after having partly made the circuit of the mountain they found lying in a ravine, dead and half devoured by dogs and pecked by jackdaws, a mule saddled and bridled, all which still further strengthened their suspicion that he who had fled was the owner of the mule and the saddle-pad.
"Tell me, good man," said Don Quixote, "do you know who is the owner of this property?"
This, sirs, is all I can say in answer to what you have asked me; and be sure that the owner of the articles you found is he whom you saw pass by with such nimbleness and so naked."
In the earliest society the proprietors made their own wealth, and so long as it comes to the owners in the direct way, no other opinion would arise in any equitable community than that property should make the law for property, and persons the law for persons.
"An' when I come un tull Auckland short o' coal, after lettun' her druft sux days wuth the fires out tull save the coal, an' wuth only twenty tons in my bunkers, I was thunkun' o' the lossin' o' time an' the expense, an' tull save the owners I took her un an' out wi'out pilotage.
An' the owners paid a fine tull the Government of a hundred pounds each for them.
And the cities, bright with lights, were as shops on these long streets--shops where business was transacted, where bunkers were replenished, cargoes taken or shifted, and orders received from the owners in London town to go elsewhere and beyond, ever along the long sea- lanes, seeking new cargoes here, carrying new cargoes there, running freights wherever shillings and pence beckoned and underwriters did not forbid.
Almost each morning a letter from my owners would arrive, directing me to go to the charterers and clamour for the ship's cargo; to threaten them with the heaviest penalties of demurrage; to demand that this assortment of varied merchandise, set fast in a landscape of ice and windmills somewhere up-country, should be put on rail instantly, and fed up to the ship in regular quantities every day.