Overweight


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Overweight

Usually refers to recommendation that leads an investor to increase their investment in a particular security or asset class. The increase is usually with respect to a benchmark. Suppose that U.S. equities compose 40% of the benchmark portfolio. If one thinks the U.S. will outperform, the investor may increase the exposure to U.S. equity to more than 40%.

Overweight

1. See: Market outperform.

2. See: Overperform.

3. Describing a portfolio where one security or industry has too much representation. For example, an overweight portfolio may be overexposed to the financial industry, which means if the financial industry suffers a downturn the portfolio will decline in value more than other similar portfolios. See also: Diversification.
References in periodicals archive ?
(7.) Calculated using the total average cost differences (PBS and MBS) in the model that adjusts for health conditions ($93.22), a total population of children aged 4 and 5 of 509,937 (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006) and an average prevalence of overweight of 20.5 percent using the LSAC population weighted average of the children at age 4-5.
This underdiagnosis of overweight and obesity is consistent with the findings of other authors (Brown et al 2006; Epstein and Ogden, 2005).
To find prevalence, age-specific cutoff values of BMI for overweight and obesity separate for boys and girls were used [Table 1].
"It is an area where prevention is better than cure and evidence shows that once a child becomes overweight, they are more likely to continue to be so in adulthood, and their children are themselves also at risk of suffering the same poor health consequences.
Knowing that a person is overweight is the first step to take charge of their health condition.
The study also found that 19 per cent of the people in the healthy weight group said they don't exercise even for 2.5 hours in a week, the number rose to 27 per cent for overweight population.
In addition to an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and some cancers, overweight and obese adults are more likely to develop symptoms of depression and of being or becoming disabled.
However, four wards in Surrey made thetop ten in terms of the fewest proportion of overweight and obese children in the country.
The 10-year risk is 8 times higher for overweight women, 18 times higher for obese women (a BMI of 30 to 34.9), and 30 times higher for the most obese women (a BMI of 35 & above).
The risk of developing type 2 diabetes was heavily dependent on how old patients were when they were overweight and at what age they reduced their bodyweight.
In our study the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children in a private rural school was 8.32% and 4.72%, respectively.
Globally almost 1.5 billion adults above the age of 20 years were found over weight in 2008 with high prevalence in female gender and nearly 43 million children <age of 5 years were overweight in 2010 .This figure is expected to increase up to 65% by the year 2015 in adult population.8