Organized Labor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Organized Labor

A group of employees in a certain company or with a certain skill who unite in a single body for purposes of negotiating wages, benefits, working conditions, and other issues with management. Members of an organized labor group must ratify decisions made by their representatives with management. Proponents of organized labor argue that it creates better working environments and played a significant role in creating the middle class in many countries. Critics contend that it creates economic inefficiency and can drive companies out of business with employees' high demands. In the United States, organized labor is regulated by the National Labor Relations Board. An organized labor group is called a union. See also: Strike.
References in periodicals archive ?
And under pressure from organized labor, Bernie Sanders recently added additional language to his "Medicare for All" plan to provide additional oversight for union members.
From Day One, his mission has been to enrich his allies in organized labor at the expense of our state and citizens.
And so it is with the economic theory of organized labor. Current economic theory, as it pertains to labor unions, is a product of developmental forces.
Spinola said he and his members realize that organized labor should come at a premium because union workers and the managing subcontractors that employ them typically have superior expertise compared to their non-union counterparts.
Within this neoliberal framework, organized labor would suffer declines in compensation, working conditions, and workers' rights.
I can begin to imagine a progressive coalition that doesn't have organized labor, as we know it, at its core.
"The inclusion of organized labor raised a lot of eyebrows because usually unions and convention centers are at odds, often at the expense of the customer," Fenton said.
Sharp decreases in union membership over the last 50 years have caused many to dismiss organized labor as irrelevant in today's labor market.
But there was a glaring omission: None of the articles highlighting this theme addressed the role of organized labor in this challenge.
Black Americans and Organized Labor: A New History By Paul Moreno Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006.
Despite these changes, African American representation in union leadership, discrimination in hiring and promotion, and training for highly skilled jobs remain problem areas for organized labor.

Full browser ?