One-way market

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One-way market

(1) A market in which only one side, the bid or asked, is quoted or firm. (2) A market that is moving strongly in one direction.

One-Way Market

A market in which there are only potential buyers or potential sellers, but not both. That is, quotes for a one-way market only have a bid or an ask price. One-way markets are, by their nature, illiquid, and, on most exchanges, dealers and/or market makers exist to prevent them from forming. However, regulations sometimes require a one-way market to form, at least temporarily. For example, some countries forbid the resale of an IPO for a certain period of time.
References in periodicals archive ?
A recurring topic in the two-sided markets literature concerns the definition of two-sided markets, and their differences with one-sided markets.
thus one-sided markets under Rochet and Tirole's definition.
Building on the previous discussion, the price structure in two-sided markets is more complex than in one-sided markets.
This stands in sharp contrast to one-sided market models, which need to set the prices above zero for consumers in order to recover costs (e.
Subsequent analysis has introduced market imperfections into the analysis of two-sided payment markets that has generated some interesting contrasts with imperfections in typical one-sided markets.
Because many industrial products are custom-made to buyers' specifications, they exhibit the characteristic of being single-buyer, one-sided markets.
The early literature was mostly focused on price theory, explaining difference between pricing in multi-sided markets and one-sided markets by emphasizing the need to coordinate users and bring all sides on board.
By contrast, in a one-sided market, firms choose the product or service characteristics and customers' value depends only on that choice.
The economics literature on platforms and two-sided markets shows that applying insights from the analysis of one-sided markets to two-sided markets might be misleading.
This argument is about one-sided markets and tells us nothing about the paid prioritization arrangements that broadband providers want to impose.
In this case there is a "multiplier" effect, as a price increase reduces demand more than in standard one-sided markets.
an example of a one-sided market, as the value to any particular caller