On

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On

Used in the context of general equities. Conjunction that denotes trade execution /indication, usually during a pre-opening look. "Looks 6 on 6000 shares at opening." See: for/at.
References in periodicals archive ?
These verses are paraphrased as "a person will live if he is not ordained to die" (lxxv), reflecting a similar sentiment to that of the Old Norse proverb above that was referenced by Deskis.
Old Norse haust (autumn) is also neuter, however the Oxford English Dictionary has it as originally masculine, and in Modern Norwegian haust/host is also masculine.
Old Norse and Middle English Versions of the Lais of Marie de France and the Translatio Studii.
Lee and Solopova begin their innovative project with a well-researched general introduction of just over fifty pages, which provides information on not only Tolkien's impressive academic career but also on the history and study of Old English, Middle English, and Old Norse literature and languages.
a spirited gesture towards the alliteration of the Old Norse 'Hjoggum ver meo hjorvi'.
Contrary to the view that the occurrence of the article in Old Icelandic or Old Norse is arbitrary, Leiss shows some regularities of the article and compares the situation with that in Modern Norwegian, where we find articles all over the place (like in English and German).
When JRR Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings, all the names of people, creatures and places were inspired by Old Norse, Old English and Finnish, as well as several made up Elvish and Orcish languages.
Despite his lack of formal schooling, Paolini invented three languages for his characters--dwarves, elves and humanoids--some based on Old Norse, some from scratch.
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-6 November 2003-Danish authorities to approve old Norse faith(C)1994-2003 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
But skiing is the pastime of choice: Norwegians invented the sport in the late 19th century, though the oldest evidence of skis--a cave drawing in the north--dates back 4,000 years (the word "ski" comes from Old Norse for "board").
Middle English steke might derive from Old Norse steik, but Scandinavian wines are out of the question.
If approved by the Scottish Executive, it will give Old Norse the same status as Gaelic and Welsh on road signs.