Old Economy

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Old Economy

The universe of companies and industries that experienced a tremendous amount of growth in the first part of the 20th century, but have since slowed down with the advent of technology companies. Examples of members of the old economy include the steel, automobile, and energy industries. It is important to note that the old economy is still relevant, with most old economy industries representing thousands of jobs and a significant proportion of GDP.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although a generation away, the table represents the outcome of a continued I growth trajectory of developing countries, compared to old economies. Prime number GDP at MER (constanr MER 2050 projected 2009 US$bn) GDP at MER (constant 2009) US 14,256 37,576 Japan 5,068 7,664 China 4,909 51,180 Germany 3,347 5,707 France 2,649 - UK 2,175 5,628 Italy 2,113 - India 31,313 Brazil 1,572 9,235 Russia 6,112 Spain 1,460 - Mexico 5,800 Canada 1,336 - Indonesia 5,358
"It's really the West and the old economies that have a growth issue.
Lusk and Birgitta Wolff present a paper entitled Trust within Brazilian New Economy Organizations: an Empirical Investigation of Gender Effects Benchmarked on Brazilian Old Economy Organizations in which they investigate gender profiles concerning trust in Supervisors, Peers and Team in the New and the Old Economies for Brazilian managers.
Now it's coming to one of the oldest of the old economies: copper mining, the drifting force behind Chile's exports.
companies in the New and Old Economies, we investigate the structure and level of executive (and nonexecutive) compensation defined as the sum of salary, annual bonus, and the values of executive stock options and long-term incentive plans (LTIPs).
With the old economies, the underperformers, as we've seen in the past, can limp along virtually forever.
At a macro level, change will come in the form of developing countries bypassing the old economies. In an infographic we show how PwC expects the BRICs to dominate the list of the ten largest economies by 2050.
First, based upon the similarity of the firms' performance as reported as part of the public information that Brazilian firms are required to publish, we clustered the six firms into two groups; and second, two experienced Brazilian financial analysts were asked to group the six firms into what they believed to be typical firms in the New and Old Economies. For example, regarding the classification by reported performance, we used average employee turnover as one of the performance statistics.
Preliminarily, to get an idea of the distribution of gender for the two institutional frameworks, we categorized gender over the length of employment for the New and the Old Economies. This provides the following two important aspects that we will use in developing the study hypotheses:
With this inference system, we see the following results for the New and Old Economies:
For relationships with peers, we find statistical significance for the personal dimension for both the New and Old Economies, where the men uniformly have scored higher than the women.
The old economies of scale arguments are now too simplistic and have become with some large companies diseconomies of scale.