Official Creditor

Official Creditor

A government or international organization that lends, especially to another government or international organization. A major example is the International Monetary Fund. The term is most common in international development.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
An official creditor group has objected to the bid.
Greater pressures on external finances are mitigated by strong official creditor support for Tunisia, reflecting the international community's backing for the country's democratic transition and its strategic importance in a precarious regional context, according to Fitch.
You will have to provide proof and if they accept it you will become an official creditor.
Kroop represents publicly traded and privately held corporate debtors and significant creditors including secured lenders, official creditor committees, commercial lessors and financial institutions in some of the largest Chapter 11 cases in the nation.
''Stop the Paris Club III meeting because the money will be used to kill our people!'' they added, referring to a planned meeting of Indonesia's official creditor nations grouped together in the so-called Paris Club.
(23) On the other hand, it is quite possible that the repayments we have seen have been motivated by the small size of most IFI loans, their below-market interest rates, and the prospect of more official creditor funds.
Pakistan has rescheduled $3.3 billion of debt repayment it owed to the Paris Club of Official Creditor Nations and $877 million owed to London Club of Commercial Creditors.
Ginandjar Kartasasmita, coordinating minister for economy, finance and industry, told reporters before a cabinet meeting that details of the debt repayment will be discussed next month at a meeting of the Paris Club, a group of official creditor nations.
Official creditor support also remains critical for Greece to meet its medium-term financing needs, given its weak economy and fragile investor confidence.
For example, multilateral or domestic measures in major financial jurisdictions could make official bilateral debt unenforceable in court if assigned to a private entity without recourse to the official creditor. (141)
depends on official creditor support for deficit and debt financing.