Offeree

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Offeree

The person or company that receives an offer.
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also prohibited from soliciting consents or advising offerees, even
(83.) Potential investors are often referred to as "offerees." See id.
Once the offeree begins to perform, the offeree is vulnerable because the offeree could either revoke the offer or engage in opportunistic behavior by making a less favorable deal because the offeree has sunk costs.
offeree's power of acceptance is terminated by his making of a
Notwithstanding the addition of Rule 1.442(c)(3), a number of Florida district courts continued to uphold joint lump sum proposals for settlement on the grounds that the particular circumstances of the cases made the failure to strictly comply with the rule a "harmless technical violation." (14) These cases usually involved a lump sum proposal by multiple offerees to a single offeror.
An expression of acceptance presumptively takes effect when put out of possession of the offeree, (91) for instance, and an agreement's terms by default hew to usage in the relevant trade.
offerees, the number of units sold, and the size and manner of the
Under a shotgun clause, a shareholder (offeror) would be permitted to offer his/ her shares for sale (offer price) to the other shareholders (offerees) and those shareholders (offerees) would have the opportunity to purchase the shares at the offer price or to sell their shares to the shareholder (offeror) at the same offer price.
It is in the dying moments of a contest when those players with the strongest of wills come alive, a characteristic intrinsic in the game's most dominant offerees.
(20) That is to say, the particular discourse that gives meaning to, and therefore makes possible, a particular form of social organizing, is itself the product offerees that exceed that particular moment of social organization which are, however, not transcendental but historically formed.
Virtually none of these laws, however, alters the right employers already have to require that conditional offerees sign an authorization for health care providers to disclose the individuals' complete medical records, nongenetic as well as genetic, to the prospective employer or its designee.