Office of Management and Budget

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Office of Management and Budget

A U.S. federal government office charged with preparing the budget and measuring the effectiveness of government programs. It was established in 1970.

Office of Management and Budget

A White House office (www.whitehouse.gov/omb) charged with assisting the president in preparation of the federal budget and supervising its administration. It also evaluates the effectiveness of agency programs,policies,and procedures.

References in periodicals archive ?
The OMB should not evade its responsibility to make a yes/no determination or opine why a submitted RIA does not comport with its established guidelines.
management initiatives, OMB uses the Presidential Management Agenda
My "emergency suspension" was based on the fact the the OMB alleged that I had failed to do a prostate exam on two patients when the chart notes on both of these patients clearly demonstrated that the exam had been done.
In addition, OMB is urging agencies to demand deeper discounts on blanket purchase agreements.
In each of these areas, OMB Watch has a large collection of news stories, analytical reports, blogs, and relevant government documents.
OMB's proposed Bulletin was the latest step by OMB in its
These numbers are purely hypothetical, for the sake of example, since the OMB has not yet developed accepted scales for scoring.
Data from the DoD IT Registry is used to report FISMA status for the entire DoD to OMB and Congress.
Congress requires the OMB to submit an annual report including its progress in regulatory reform and a cost/benefit analysis of federal regulations on state, local and tribal entities.
Last summer, when the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) released its annual mid-session review of the budget, OMB director (and former assistant to the president) Joshua Bolten had some great news: "Because the president's economic policies are working, we are ahead of pace to meet the goal of cutting the deficit in half within five years.
We argue that OMB's numbers are plausible, given the methodology that OMB uses.
For federal government financial managers, the OMB represents the pinnacle, since this is where it all comes together.