density

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density

In zoning, the number of things allowed per unit of land, such as number of houses, occupants,or families per acre.

References in periodicals archive ?
He said the high nutrient density products will provide at least a third of the desired major macro and micronutrients requirement stipulated by the World Health Organisation, Food and Nutrition Board.
Nutrient density scoring, or calculating a numeric score for foods based on their nutrient profiles, could be an important metric to include on the front of food packages to help consumers identify more healthful products.
A good nutrient density comparison of foods would be avocado on whole grain toast versus a Snickers bar.
Cress scores the highest on the aggregate nutrient density index which measures the vitamin, mineral and phyto nutrient content of foods per calorie.
SUPER VEGETABLES: WATERCRESS Cress scores the highest on the aggregate nutrient density index, which measures the vitamin, mineral and phyto nutrient content of foods per calorie.
Similar analyses found that grain foods were meaningful contributors of nutrient density in the American diet of children and adolescents throughout the various age groups examined.
"There are a lot of little of ways you can health up a burger and increase the nutrient density a little," she adds.
Wakshlag says, is whether cats on dry food are fatter due to the nutrient density of dry versus wet.
The nutrient density (%) of composite diets and intake of total digestible nutrients (TDN) (g/kg [W.sup.0.75] were significantly (p<0.05) higher in cows fed BGF-100 supplement with comparable values between control and BGF-50 supplemented cows.
Simple Mills also is looking for its ingredients to maximize nutrient density. "A lot of allergen-free products, especially in the baking world, are made with white rice or potato starch base devoid of all nutrients," Lorge says.
Most fruits and vegetables are low in energy density (calories) and high in nutrient density. Many fresh fruits and vegetables act as a natural weight management tool, forcing the customer to peel, chop or cut the product before eating, while often the volume and moisture content of produce slow down the rate of consumption.