Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding the essential content of ethics in undergraduate nursing education, Corley (2002) and others (Doane, 2002; Johnstone, 2017; Parsons et al, 2001) have argued that a principled approach to teaching nursing ethics can lead to a justification of unwise nursing actions, rather than to the development of sound ethical judgements.
A pluralist view of nursing ethics. Nurs Philos 2006; 7: 157- 164.
If, as contended by Dooley and McCarthy, nursing ethics involves exploration and analysis of beliefs, values and relationships then it follows that there is a social dimension which requires consideration of and respect for others (Kerridge et al., 2009).
(29) Postcoloniai nursing ethics challenges nursing to pay increased attention to the role of marginalization and racialization of the Other in health inequalities.
With several nursing specialities reporting overriding ethical dilemmas (Redman & Fry 2000) and additional considerations created by escalating advances in technology and knowledge (Torjuul & Sorlie 2006) it can be argued that nursing ethics will be different from medical ethics.
That is the nursing ethics. Mr Al Demestani has done nothing wrong.
This line of thinking, whether intentional or not, may be supported in the literature on nursing ethics and professional responsibility, which, at the same time, acknowledges that acting contrary to one's conscience is an assault on one's integrity and an affront to one's identity.
Grace (ethics and adult health, Boston College, Massachusetts) focuses consideration of nursing ethics on the specific issues facing advanced practice nurses.
It also raises important questions about the risks and consequences of a health issue getting mixed up with a criminal issue, and the adequacy of contemporary nursing ethics to guide nurses on how best to uphold the public interest when things go wrong.
Judy Barone BSN, JD, Institute of Nursing Ethics, Association of Nurse Attorneys
In the pilot study, to be published in Nursing Ethics, each healthcare professional claims to have experienced the Hollywood Code.
(1998) An enquiry into a combined approach for nursing ethics. Nursing Ethics 5 (2), 123-137.

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