Numismatic Coin

Numismatic Coin

A historically significant or otherwise very old coin, especially one worth more than its face value. Examples of numismatic coins include buffalo nickels in the United States and Roman denarii. Numismatic coins can be important to the history of money and can be valuable to the study of economic history in general.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the same sale, a further lot containing a collection of pre decimal coins, Churchill crowns and Royal Mint Numismatic coin sets, sold for PS550.
The Morgan dollar is "by far the most widely collected and traded numismatic coin in the world" (Louis Golino, CoinWeek.com).
For example, a numismatic coin worth $200,000 can be shipped insured by registered mail in the United States for $180 and, for coins worth up to $100,000, shipped insured internationally anywhere for $55 ($46 to Canada and $52 to Europe).
However, the exchange of a numismatic coin for a bullion-type coin is not a like-kind exchange.
Global Monetary Reserve is a trusted source for Precious Metal investing, including Precious Metal IRA accounts and Numismatic coin collecting and selling.
The exchange of a numismatic coin for a bullion-type coin (see Q 1185) is not a like-kind exchange.
Numismatic coins are rare, often old, and usually originally minted for circulation rather than for collectors.
The result will be the manufacturing of numismatic coins with the portrait of Nikola Tesla.