Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty


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Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty

An international treaty by which signatories agree not to pursue nuclear weapons technology. Signatories already possessing weapons agree not to distribute them to other countries and to take steps toward disarmament. However, signatories may pursue nuclear power for energy or other peaceful uses. Most of the world's countries are signatories. It entered into force in 1970 and is renewed every five years.
References in periodicals archive ?
Approach to the 2005 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference: An ACT Interview with Assistant Secretary of State Stephen Rademaker," Apr.
Lorenzana pointed out that the Philippines was a signatory to the global nuclear nonproliferation treaty and that the Constitution expressly prohibits war as an instrument of national policy.
Despite being non-signatories to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), both India and Pakistan have formally submitted their bids to join NSG.
It follows Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) in letter and spirit.
These are topped with the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), a base for multi-party action on disarmament and international security.
All group members have signed the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, either as nuclear weapons states (the United States, Britain, France, Russia, China) or as non-nuclear weapons states (everybody else).
The conference is held every five years to review compliance with the 1970 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, the agreement known as the NPT under which the countries recognised by the treaty as having nuclear weapons the United States, Russia, China, Britain and France committed to pursue nuclear disarmament.
"We support peaceful nuclear power programmes as long as obligations under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty to which Egypt is a signatory and obligations to the IAEA are fully met and the highest international standards regulating security, nonproliferation, export controls, and physical security are strictly followed," Psaki said.
Lavrov highlighted that Russia's annexation of Crimea in March made the peninsula now part of a state that possesses nuclear armaments under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. Political experts say the statement from Lavrov only goes to show that Russia will not give up Crimea.
One analysts wrote that "for those who've signed the 1968 NonProliferation Treaty (NPT), not developing weapons was the condition for getting US help on nuclear energy; so a nonsignatory like India getting it anyway had a lot of people wringing their hands over the death of the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty as we know it".
Much of that strategy was premised on the assumption that the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) and the regime based on it would remain the solid, core foundation for international security.
Reviewing the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) edited by Henry Sokolski.
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