Non-Cash Charge

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Non-Cash Charge

Any charge to a company that does not result in a cash outlay. Examples of non-cash charges include depreciation and amortization. For example, depreciation reduces the value of an asset but does not require a reduction in the cash on hand. A non-cash charge reduces a company's earnings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Net loss attributable to common stockholders for the fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2019 was approximately $6.2 million, including approximately $1.2 million of noncash charges, compared to $4.2 million for the fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2018, primarily attributable to increased research and development activities relating to the Company's CNS drug development programs.
Results for the fourth quarter of 2017 included one-time noncash charges of $141.3 million, or 36 cents per diluted share, related to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.
assessments and $1.16 million in other noncash charges. The company
Onetime charges associated with achieving these benefits are anticipated to be approximately 1.25 times gross annualized savings, of which around 25% to 30% are estimated to be noncash charges.
Net loss attributable to common stockholders for the first quarter of 2010 was $1.9 million compared with $3.2 million in 2009, and 2009 included other noncash charges related to the company's financing transactions during the year.
Continental Airlines will record USD 44 million in special charges for the second quarter, USD 43 million of which comprises noncash impairments on owned 737-300/-500 aircraft and related assets (USD 31 million) and noncash charges related to the disposal of three -300s (USD 8 million) and "certain obsolete spare parts" (USD 4 million).
Caliper took $45.3 million in noncash charges during the fourth quarter for goodwill impairment and restructuring.
Noncash charges will consist primarily of accelerated depreciation and asset write-downs.
Some financial information about the company has trickled out in recent weeks, indicating that total revenue last year was $784 million, with earnings before noncash charges, interest and taxes of either $169 million (apparently before corporate overhead, which in the event of a takeover would largely disappear) or of $147 million (apparently after corporate overhead).
But investors often discount such noncash charges anyway.
A committee of financial executives from Institute member companies reviewed the issue and noted that the two methods could result in significant differences in reported cash costs, since staged pit amortization charges generally have been reported as noncash charges. The committee noted that, while both methods were theoretically correct, deferred stripping is the more widely used method in the gold industry, therefore, it was adopted as the preferred method.
For the rest of the industry, noncash charges most newspaper companies have taken in the past will fall off their earnings this year.