Non Vessel Operating Common Carrier

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Non Vessel Operating Common Carrier

A company that ships goods on behalf of a client, especially internationally, but that does not own its own ships or airplanes. It operates much like any other carrier, issuing its own bills of lading or air waybills. The only difference is that an NVOCC does not own the means of transport. An NVOCC is also called a non vessel owning carrier.
References in periodicals archive ?
Services provided by a freight forwarder may include: international or domestic transportation brokerage; customs house brokerage; non-vessel operating common carriers (NVOCC); indirect air carriers (IAC); motor truck carrier (MTC); warehousemen.
us customs AES filing was basically developed by the interest and voices of the large and small exporters, freight forwarders, transport authorities, vessel and non-vessel operating common carriers in the US.
[USPRwire, Wed Oct 01 2014] Seafreight forwarders, which are also known as non-vessel operating common carriers (NVOCCs), are intermediary agents that arrange shipments for industries from manufacturers to the final point of distribution.
Chief commercial officer Edward Ryan said at the time that the combination of IESa[euro](tm) logistic solutions and Descartesa[euro](tm) logistics technology platform would allow his company to enhance its application footprint for freight forwarders, non-vessel operating common carriers (NVOCCs) and customs brokers.
A The ISF Readiness Program of Descartes informs, educates and provides access to importers, customs brokers, carriers, freight forwarders, non-vessel operating common carriers (NVOCCs) and shippers to the Descartes ISF Services.
Non-Vessel Operating Common Carriers (NVOCCs) are now free to open offices and conduct maritime business.
Like a vessel pulling away from the dock, a movement to allow ocean consolidators--known as non-vessel operating common carriers, or NVOCCs--to sign service contracts is picking up steam.
Its logistics and supply chain solutions, aimed at helping freight forwarders, non-vessel operating common carriers (NVOCCs) and customs brokers to manage their business and increase profitability, are used by over 600 customers in more than 70 countries globally.
Since early 2002, two groups representing ocean freight consolidators, or non-vessel operating common carriers (NVOCCs), have alleged that the members of the Transpacific Stabilization Agreement (TSA) have actively discriminated against them.