Non-Durable Good

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Non-Durable Good

A good that is intended to be used completely within three years. Examples of non-durable goods include office supplies, food, and newspapers. While they tend to be less expensive than durable goods, non-durable goods are a major subset of consumer goods.
References in periodicals archive ?
The "Non-Durable Goods Merchant Wholesalers Global Market Report 2019" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.
As regards the structure of investments, energy and water-related industries have the biggest relative share yet again, at 42.0%, followed by industries producing intermediate goods and industries producing non-durable goods with 29.5% and 16.1%, respectively.
"The slowdown in non-durable goods sales growth since the first quarter of 2012 can in all likelihood be ascribed to the lacklustre pace of job creation during the first half of 2012 and high--albeit decelerating--food and beverage price increases," said Engelbrecht.
Durable consumer goods increased by 1.8% and non-durable goods by 2.5%.a
The authority added that the highest year-on-year increase was recorded with 34.2% in production of capital goods in December 2010, followed by the 24.4% increase in production of intermediate goods, 8.3% rise in energy, 7.5% increase in production of durable consumer goods and 5% rise in non-durable goods.
That for energy fell by 8.1%, for non-durable goods by 2.4% and for durables by 1.7%.
Consumption of durable goods decreased 14.1% in the third quarter after decreasing 2.8% the period before and non-durable goods fell by 6.4% after rising 3.9% in the second quarter.
Employers in construction plan to reduce staffing levels, while hiring in durable and non-durable goods manufacturing, finance/insurance/ real estate, education and public administration is expected to remain unchanged.
Household expenditure on non-durable goods and low-end durables should show modest but sustainable growth over the upcoming year.
Severe deterioration in real household income over the past year has forced families to substantially reduce spending on food, beverages, and other non-durable goods. To the greatest degree possible, households have substituted local food products for imports.
On average, non-durable goods account for the largest segments of the household budgets.
Slovakian producers of non-durable goods are in a position to benefit from growth in household income in 2004 and 2005.