Nominal dollars


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Nominal dollars: Real terms

Nominal dollars

Dollars that are not adjusted for inflation.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Nominal

Describing a variable that does not take inflation into account. For example, when considering GDP growth, if GDP has grown 10% in nominal terms and the inflation rate is 3%, real GDP growth is only 7%.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The report estimated the PLA's 2003 budget in $30.6 billion in nominal dollars and $141 billion on a PPP basis.
While per capita health care expenditures in real terms have more than doubled since 1955 (and gone up nearly five-fold in nominal dollars), the proportion of disposable income used for out-of-pocket health care expenditures is literally unchanged at 3.3 percent.
The wRECK is the rate per square foot that, if paid each year in nominal dollars, would equal the same total present value as the proposed variable cash flows.
As an alternative, one could first list benefits and costs in nominal dollars (i.e., including inflation) and then discount benefits and costs using a nominal discount rate (inflation now included).
For example, in 2016, the output of franchise establishments in nominal dollars is expected to increase by $52 billion in the United States.
government cumulatively spent over $ 1 billion (in nominal dollars) on desalination R&D alone.
Nominal Dollars: A measure used to express nominal price.
In nominal Dollars, the Hunt brothers' multi-billion-dollar corner only saw it more highly priced on 5 trading days in Jan.
It found that wholesale natural gas prices would increase by 70%--from today's $5 or $6 per million British thermal units to more than $13 (in nominal dollars)--if an Alaskan natural gas pipeline is not operational by 2020, if no new LNG terminals are built, if the proportion of U.S.
Before the author gets into the meat of the book, he also provides a beginner's guide to the economic jargon encountered in using the data, such as annual rates, real and nominal dollars, moving averages, revisions and benchmarks, and seasonal adjustments.