loss

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Related to Noise-induced hearing loss: NIHL

Loss

The opposite of gain.

Loss

Extracting less money from a transaction than one put into it. For example, a business' expenses may be $1 million for a year but it may only take in $800,000 in revenue. In such a case, the business has suffered a $200,000 loss. This is not always bad; most businesses lose money in the first few years of operation and this can reduce their tax liability when they do make a profit. However, losses over an extended period of time ultimately result in failure. See also: Gain, Paper Loss, Loss Carryforward, Loss Carryback.

loss

The deficiency of the amount received as opposed to the amount invested in a transaction. Compare gain. See also net loss.

loss

the shortfall between a firm's sales revenues received from the sale of its products and the total costs incurred in producing the firm's output (see BREAK-EVEN ANALYSIS). Losses may be of a temporary nature occasioned by, for example, a downturn in demand (see BUSINESS CYCLE) or due to an exceptional level of expenditures (such as the launch of a series of new products). Short-term losses are usually financed by a firm running down its RESERVES or by an increase in borrowings. Losses which are sustained over time typically arise from a firm's poor competitive position in a market (see COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE), and unless competitiveness can be restored market exit or DIVESTMENT may be the only practical way of remedying the situation. See MARKET SYSTEM.

loss

the difference that arises when a firm's TOTAL REVENUES are less than TOTAL COSTS. In the SHORT RUN, where firms’ total revenues are insufficient to cover VARIABLE COSTS, then they will exit from the market unless they perceive this situation as being temporary. In these circumstances, where firms’ total revenues are sufficient to cover variable costs and make some CONTRIBUTION towards FIXED COSTS, then they will continue to produce despite overall losses. In the LONG RUN, however, unless firms’ revenues are sufficient to cover both variable and fixed costs, then their overall losses will cause them to exit from the market. See MARKET EXIT, LOSS MINIMIZATION, PROFIT-AND-LOSS ACCOUNT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Noise-induced Hearing Loss and the Individual Susceptibility to the Noise.
If you believe you are suffering with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss after working for the NCB, please do not hesitate to contact our experienced industrial disease team.
Guerra MR, Lourenco PM, Bustamante-Teixeira MT, Alves MJ; Prevalence of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Metallurgical Company.
2 million children suffering from irreversible noise-induced hearing loss in the US alone.
Therefore it appears that VWF might be a marker for increased individual susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss without the vibration conferring increased risk of hearing loss from noise exposure.
However, concern is growing that children and young adults are developing noise-induced hearing loss as a result of 'environmental' over-exposure to amplified music, especially through the use of personal music devices such as MP3 players.
12) Since OAEs directly measure the responsiveness of the outer hair cells of the cochlea, which is the primary site of the lesion in noise-induced hearing loss, these measures can identify changes in auditory functioning before conventional measures such as pure-tone audiometry.
report in the August 2009 American Journal of Public Health that New York City subways are loud enough to increase the risk for noise-induced hearing loss, an irreversible condition affecting about 250 million people worldwide.
Although occupational noise-induced hearing loss is a totally preventable condition, once the damage has been done there is no way of reversing the effects.
There is no medical treatment or cure for permanent noise-induced hearing loss.
Noise-induced hearing loss associated with the workplace has been well described.
Members of a committee, made up of individuals from universities, labor organizations, and industry in the US, review research and make recommendations for respiratory disease, noise-induced hearing loss, ground failure, and disaster prevention; the reduction of musculoskeletal and traumatic injuries; and surveillance, training, and intervention effectiveness.