loss

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Related to Noise-induced hearing loss: NIHL

Loss

The opposite of gain.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Loss

Extracting less money from a transaction than one put into it. For example, a business' expenses may be $1 million for a year but it may only take in $800,000 in revenue. In such a case, the business has suffered a $200,000 loss. This is not always bad; most businesses lose money in the first few years of operation and this can reduce their tax liability when they do make a profit. However, losses over an extended period of time ultimately result in failure. See also: Gain, Paper Loss, Loss Carryforward, Loss Carryback.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

loss

The deficiency of the amount received as opposed to the amount invested in a transaction. Compare gain. See also net loss.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

loss

the shortfall between a firm's sales revenues received from the sale of its products and the total costs incurred in producing the firm's output (see BREAK-EVEN ANALYSIS). Losses may be of a temporary nature occasioned by, for example, a downturn in demand (see BUSINESS CYCLE) or due to an exceptional level of expenditures (such as the launch of a series of new products). Short-term losses are usually financed by a firm running down its RESERVES or by an increase in borrowings. Losses which are sustained over time typically arise from a firm's poor competitive position in a market (see COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE), and unless competitiveness can be restored market exit or DIVESTMENT may be the only practical way of remedying the situation. See MARKET SYSTEM.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

loss

the difference that arises when a firm's TOTAL REVENUES are less than TOTAL COSTS. In the SHORT RUN, where firms’ total revenues are insufficient to cover VARIABLE COSTS, then they will exit from the market unless they perceive this situation as being temporary. In these circumstances, where firms’ total revenues are sufficient to cover variable costs and make some CONTRIBUTION towards FIXED COSTS, then they will continue to produce despite overall losses. In the LONG RUN, however, unless firms’ revenues are sufficient to cover both variable and fixed costs, then their overall losses will cause them to exit from the market. See MARKET EXIT, LOSS MINIMIZATION, PROFIT-AND-LOSS ACCOUNT.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Individual susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss: An old topic revisited.
To ensure that all persons can benefit from efforts to prevent noise-induced hearing loss, a coordinated public health hearing loss reduction and mitigation approach should focus on effective population-based preventive interventions that go beyond clinical service and traditional areas of diagnosis, treatment, and research and focus on epidemiologic surveillance, health promotion, and disease prevention.
Analysis of plasma microRNA expression profiles in male textile workers with noise-induced hearing loss. Hear Res 2016; 333: 275-282, doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2015.08.003.
Manipulation of intrinsic cell death cascades using different antiapoptotic inhibitors is also a promising strategy to protect hair cells after the noise-induced hearing loss. Multiple studies have shown the activation of MAPK/JNK pathways in cellular stress response.
Smoking as a risk factor in noise-induced hearing loss. J Occup Med 1987; 29: 741-5.
Abbreviations NIHL: Noise-induced hearing loss ABR: Auditory brainstem response YMRE: Yang Mi Ryung extract ROS: Reactive oxygen species 4-HNE: 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal.
Noise-induced hearing loss first appeared at 4000 Hz and gradually spread to lower frequencies.
Dobie, MD, et al., "Occupational Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. ACOEM Task Force on Occupational Hearing Loss," Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 54, no.
Noise-induced hearing loss can be caused by a one-time exposure to a loud noise as well as by repeated exposure to sounds at various loudness levels over an extended period of time.
A hospital based prospective epidemiological study was conducted at Jinnah Sindh Medical University (JSMU) designed to evaluate effects of noise-induced hearing loss due to road traffic at Gurumander, Tibet Center, Marry Weather Tower places of Karachi.
These habits have the potential to cause noise-induced hearing loss.
Long-term exposure to sounds over 85 decibels can cause hearing loss, and noise-induced hearing loss can also be caused by a one-time exposure to an intensely loud noise.