loss

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Related to Noise-induced hearing loss: NIHL

Loss

The opposite of gain.

Loss

Extracting less money from a transaction than one put into it. For example, a business' expenses may be $1 million for a year but it may only take in $800,000 in revenue. In such a case, the business has suffered a $200,000 loss. This is not always bad; most businesses lose money in the first few years of operation and this can reduce their tax liability when they do make a profit. However, losses over an extended period of time ultimately result in failure. See also: Gain, Paper Loss, Loss Carryforward, Loss Carryback.

loss

The deficiency of the amount received as opposed to the amount invested in a transaction. Compare gain. See also net loss.

loss

the shortfall between a firm's sales revenues received from the sale of its products and the total costs incurred in producing the firm's output (see BREAK-EVEN ANALYSIS). Losses may be of a temporary nature occasioned by, for example, a downturn in demand (see BUSINESS CYCLE) or due to an exceptional level of expenditures (such as the launch of a series of new products). Short-term losses are usually financed by a firm running down its RESERVES or by an increase in borrowings. Losses which are sustained over time typically arise from a firm's poor competitive position in a market (see COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE), and unless competitiveness can be restored market exit or DIVESTMENT may be the only practical way of remedying the situation. See MARKET SYSTEM.

loss

the difference that arises when a firm's TOTAL REVENUES are less than TOTAL COSTS. In the SHORT RUN, where firms’ total revenues are insufficient to cover VARIABLE COSTS, then they will exit from the market unless they perceive this situation as being temporary. In these circumstances, where firms’ total revenues are sufficient to cover variable costs and make some CONTRIBUTION towards FIXED COSTS, then they will continue to produce despite overall losses. In the LONG RUN, however, unless firms’ revenues are sufficient to cover both variable and fixed costs, then their overall losses will cause them to exit from the market. See MARKET EXIT, LOSS MINIMIZATION, PROFIT-AND-LOSS ACCOUNT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abbreviations: 6-FP = 6-formylpterin, ANOVA = analysis of variance, CAP = compound action potential, CO = carbon monoxide, DPOAE = distortion product otoacoustic emission, f1 = first fundamental frequency, f2 = second fundamental frequency, GM = geometric mean, IM = intramuscular, IP = intraperitoneal, LA = lipoic acid, NIHL = noise-induced hearing loss, OBN = octave-band noise, OHC = outer hair cell, PBN = phenyl-N-tert-butyl-nitrone, PBS = phosphate-buffered saline, ROS = reactive oxygen species, SPL = sound pressure level, VA = Department of Veterans Affairs.
There are several low-cost noise controls tat can significantly reduce the risk of noise-induced hearing loss in the workplace," says Stephen I.
Results of the research will help the state set standards for noise-induced hearing loss in the logging and wood products industry, a major employer in northern Michigan.
Sounds in the workplace and sounds of everyday life encountered in the community as a whole make noise-induced hearing loss a man-made disease that affects all members of society,'' Persky said.
Employers can prevent or minimize noise-induced hearing loss by implementing hearing conservation programs.
Prolonged exposure to noise in excess of 85 decibels (dB), about the loudness of a hair dryer, smoke alarm or blender, poses the risk of noise-induced hearing loss, according to Witt.
These include repetitive strain injury, eyesight and posture problems, transient balance disorder, tinnitus and noise-induced hearing loss.
The study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit showed that healthy rats are less likely to suffer the long-term effects of noise-induced hearing loss when given resveratrol before being exposed to loud noise for a long period of time.
Magnesium treatment has been repeatedly shown to reduce the incidence of both temporary and permanent noise-induced hearing loss.
Noise higher than 85 db can cause serious damage to your hearing and it may take only 15 minutes of exposure to inflict permanent noise-induced hearing loss.
He said: "Traditionally, noise-induced hearing loss was a disease of adults who worked in noisy occupations or used firearms.
Noise-induced hearing loss is a disabling condition with significant social consequences in addition to its limiting effect on educational and vocational prospects.