New York Cotton Exchange


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New York Cotton Exchange (NYCE)

A historic commodities exchange in New York which traded futures and options on cotton, frozen concentrated orange juice, and potatoes, as well as interest rate, currency, and index futures and options. In June 2004, the NYCE merged with the Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange to form the New York Board of Trade. As a result of this merger, all previous exchanges and subsidiaries ceased to exist, including the Coffee, Sugar, & Cocoa Exchange, the New York Cotton Exchange, the Citrus Associates of the New York Cotton Exchange, the New York Futures Exchange (NYFE), and the FINEX Exchange. All markets are now referred to as the New York Board of Trade or NYBOT.

New York Cotton Exchange

A commodity exchange in New York City. Established in 1870, it trades cotton and cotton derivatives almost exclusively, though it has established subsidiaries over the years to trade commodities like citrus and wool. It was a very important exchange in the United States for much of the late 19th and early 20th centuries because of the centrality of cotton to the American economy. In 1998, it became a subsidiary of the New York Board of Trade.

New York Cotton Exchange (NYCE)

An organized securities exchange located in New York City that provides facilities for trading futures and futures options in cotton and frozen orange juice.
References in periodicals archive ?
The October 1991 Florida crop forecast (1991/92 season) was much smaller than expected, and orange juice futures prices for near-term contracts on the New York Cotton Exchange rose sharply in late 1991.
Similarly, the declining trending was prevailing on the New York Cotton Exchange.
Ehsan said the cotton price jumped by 3 cents to 82.10 cents per pound during the past one week trading at New York Cotton Exchange, which buoyed the cotton in the local market as well.
(CSCE) and the New York Cotton Exchange (NYCE)--on March 30, 2000.
The others are: The Coffee, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange, New York Futures Exchange, New York Cotton Exchange. In terms of bids for the purchase, Alan Hanson, spokesperson for the Commodity Exchange, said there were two merger bids presented to his exchange -- one from the Chicago Board of Trade and one from Coffee Sugar & Cocoa Exchanges.
For an additional fee, investors can get futures commodity prices from the Chicago Board of Trade, Chicago Mercantile Exchange, International Monetary Market, Commodity Exchange Corp., New York Cotton Exchange, New York Mercantile Exchange, Kansas City Board of Trade and Mid America Commodity Exchange.
The world leading markets including New York Cotton Exchange came under renewed selling pressure where all future contracts closed lower.
Following the merger of the CSCE and The New York Cotton Exchange, Bowe, former president of the CSCE, was appointed NYBOT president in June 1998.
The New York Cotton Exchange, after experiencing short-lived recovery owing to fear of damage to standing cotton crop by hurricane once again came under pressure after the US Department of Agriculture reported slower cotton exports.
The world's leading markets including New York Cotton Exchange also closed easy due to falling demand.

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