new town

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new town

In keeping with the expression “all things old are new again,”modern residential development is focusing on a small-town atmosphere called the new town concept.It includes sidewalks and community parks plus offices,retail,places of worship,and schools within the project itself and usually within walking distance of residential areas.It may even include some home-above-retail or home-above-office concepts and satellite offices for government services such as license renewal.

References in periodicals archive ?
Washington had been traditionally associated with the coal industry, but with the new town came new industry, and an influx of new homes, schools and community centres.
The project, which will be funded by the Saudi government and whose contract has been awarded by the Housing Ministry of Saudi Arabia, is aimed at building a new town named Dahiyat al-Fursan, 35 kilometers north from the capital city of Riyadh, which will be almost twice the size (38 km) of the Korean new town in Bundang (19.6 km).
The New Towns Programme drew on the expertise and enthusiasm of a group of committed and visionary planners and architects.
"I want both suggested options for access to the new town if possible because I want people to be able to reach their homes easily," said Mr Al Hamer.
The new town of Parand as one of the new towns of Tehran is situated 40 km southwest of Tehran on the way to Saveh.
The study said that, across Britain, affordability in new towns is at its best level since the credit crunch in 2007, with Cwmbran seventh in the UK, with Newtown 10th.
New Town Builders was already at the forefront of energy efficiency.
Some of it dates from the early years when the new towns were being established but with wise redevelopment, several landmark schemes have emerged.
After the Second World War, 24 new towns sprang up and the Halifax has found that house prices in three quarters of them have lagged behind their regional average.
This relative failure was due to the inadequacy of government's financial aid and the absence of a planning and development agency comparable with the new town development corporation.
Rouse's town is governed, like Reston, by a private (though elected) association; it is divided, like Reston, into villages; it is seen, like Reston, as one of the more successful new towns of the 1960s.