New Jurisprudence

New Jurisprudence

A derogatory term used from the late 19th through the mid-20th century to describe the use of social contract theory in law. That is, new jurisprudence represented the idea that law should reflect popular will, as opposed to natural law.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stressing on the need to develop a new jurisprudence in the backdrop of recession, he said the rights of the poor had remained only on paper.
Topics of the symposium included "Ethical Considerations for a New Jurisprudence," "Indigenous Tenets for an Era of Climate Change," "Inuit, Global Warming and Human Rights: The Right to Be Cold," "Law for an Ecological Age," "Recovery of Natural Law as a Paradigm for a New Jurisprudence," and "Do Humans Have Standing to Deny Trees Rights?
A vision of human society arose centered on the welfare and happiness of individuals, and with this vision, came notions of individual liberty and rights for all human beings from which came a new politics and a new jurisprudence.
Finally, he proposes principles for successful reentry and building blocks for a new jurisprudence of prisoner reintegration.
The leading case in the Court's new jurisprudence on federal-state relations is New York v.
A new Justinian would have to "go in person from state to state to inform himself,(2) of the spirit of the new jurisprudence, and by the time he had come round, it would have changed again.