New Jurisprudence

New Jurisprudence

A derogatory term used from the late 19th through the mid-20th century to describe the use of social contract theory in law. That is, new jurisprudence represented the idea that law should reflect popular will, as opposed to natural law.
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In these countries, we have a new jurisprudence which is called surrogacy.
The court said the new jurisprudence requires that the main plunderer be identified in the information.
This decision creates a new jurisprudence which highlights the gravity of crimes against cultural and religious heritage.
A new jurisprudence evolved in ' Sunil Batra's case (1978)' when the court defined that imposition of solitary confinement on a death row convict was illegal.
Stressing on the need to develop a new jurisprudence in the backdrop of recession, he said the rights of the poor had remained only on paper.
Regular Session, 2007), the Sunset Bill for the Texas BON, added the new jurisprudence exam requirement for initial licensure [Texas Occupations Code, Sec.
Topics of the symposium included "Ethical Considerations for a New Jurisprudence," "Indigenous Tenets for an Era of Climate Change," "Inuit, Global Warming and Human Rights: The Right to Be Cold," "Law for an Ecological Age," "Recovery of Natural Law as a Paradigm for a New Jurisprudence," and "Do Humans Have Standing to Deny Trees Rights?
that Protestants have long held over American political and educational institutions; (2) prayer represents an issue that, unlike most controversies in American history, the political system did not resolve quickly; and (3) the controversy inaugurated a radical new jurisprudence where schools "that had been founded to instill religious truths were now .
A vision of human society arose centered on the welfare and happiness of individuals, and with this vision, came notions of individual liberty and rights for all human beings from which came a new politics and a new jurisprudence.
Finally, he proposes principles for successful reentry and building blocks for a new jurisprudence of prisoner reintegration.
This goal is in the service of Baer's desire to construct a new jurisprudence of sexual equality, one that avoids the pitfalls Baer perceives as inherent in the efforts of others to date.
To understand whether our new jurisprudence is a sound extrapolation of principles latent in the Constitution, or a road mistake nly taken, it seems that late twentieth century Americans must address not only constitutional but cosmic questions.