Cash Flow After Taxes

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Cash Flow After Taxes

In accounting, a measure of a company's cash flow after all taxes are paid. It is calculated by taking the net income and adding back in the value of all non-cash expenses, notably amortization and depreciation. Publicly-traded companies with a high cash flow after taxes are in a better position to distribute cash dividends than those with a low cash flow after taxes. In addition to this, it is also used as a measure of general performance and financial health.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The infrastructure sector saw a massive 60.5 per cent decline in net cash flow from operations.
From equation (1) we see that the net cash flow measure assumes that existing investors reinvest their dividends and that new money is invested at the end of each quarter.
However, adding debt to the capital structure to reduce the WACC only works to a certain point, since too much debt can actually increase risk and constrain the company's ability to generate net cash flow. When determining the optimum level of debt for a private company, good proxies to consider are the capital structures of similar public companies.
Budgeted RevPAR and net cash flow for 2004 is $65.5 and $31.7 million respectively, compared with $73.6 and $56.7 million at securitization.
Preparing a cash-flow budget involves preparing a sales forecast and projecting cash inflow and outflow, which results in net cash flow. Cash-flow budgets should be reviewed and adjusted periodically to reflect changes in revenue projections and expenses, as well as changes in the economic environment that affect businesses.
industry has the potential for a US$ 33 billion positive impact on the industry's net cash flow. While full achievement of the potential is not likely, technologies already emerging from the program indicate that 25% to 30% of the potential is reasonable.
As a result, net cash flow from operating activities (NCFO) is contaminated by the income tax effects of investing and financing activities.
Most managers use both external criteria and internal calculations and determinations; e.g., net cash flow projections for an asset or a group of assets, inmost circumstances.
The Net Cash Flow associated with a capital expenditure is the amount of cash after all expenses an investment generates per period of time.
The main difference between the operating balance and the net cash flow from operations is that the former is calculated on an accrual basis rather than a cash basis.