scorched earth

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Scorched Earth Policy

An antitakeover measure in which a company sells many or all of its "good" or desirable assets and/or issues an extraordinary amount of debt. A scorched earth policy is designed to make the company less attractive to potential acquirers. The obvious disadvantage to a scorched earth policy is the possibility that, even if the company remains independent, it may have acquired so many liabilities that it may not be able to maintain its operations easily. See also: Poison pill, Suicide pill.

scorched earth

An antitakeover strategy in which the target firm disposes of those assets or divisions considered particularly desirable by the raider. Thus, by making itself less attractive, the target discourages the takeover attempt. Such a strategy is almost certain to penalize the shareholders of the target firm. Compare crown jewel.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Letters, composed during the three years before Nero ordered Seneca to commit suicide, is, as the translators point out, Seneca's "most significant philosophical contribution" and "his most innovative venture in literary composition." Though each letter is addressed to Lucilius, Seneca notes early on "the work that I am doing is for posterity ...
R O M A N emperor Nero ordered his slaves to the mountains to collect snow and ice to make flavoured ice cream during the first century.
ICE CREAM In 1AD, Roman Emperor Nero ordered runners to pass buckets of snow from the mountains along the Appian Way down to Rome to be flavoured with red wine and honey.
In the first century AD, Roman emperor Nero ordered runners to pass buckets of snow from the mountains down to Rome.
As a sign of remorse, Roman Emperor Nero ordered a year's supply of cinnamon be burnt after he murdered his wife.
After a fire in AD 64, Nero ordered the rebuilding of much of the city and the opulent palace was finished in AD 68, the year of the emperor's suicide.
Our understanding of Stoicism relies therefore on the secondhand references of other philosophers and historians and the writings of three men who lived almost 400 years after the school began: Seneca, whom Nero ordered to kill himself while Epictetus was in Rome, Epictetus, and Epictetus's student, Marcus Aurelius.