Neo-Liberal

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Neo-Liberal

One who favors free trade, globalization, and openness to the free market. The term is used frequently in an international context, but it may also refer to the politics of a single country. Neo-liberals advocate floating exchange rates, the reduction or elimination of tariffs, privatization of nationalized companies, and similar practices. International organizations well-known for advocating neo-liberal policies include the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The author, Wellesley historian Quinn Slobodian, contends that the "neoliberal" institutions of today--by which he means the World Trade Organization (WTO), the World Bank, and an assortment of international trade conventions--are the progeny of the aforementioned classical liberals of the early 20th century.
Thus, whilst the broad impetus towards competition might align with neoliberal instincts, a research environment that is increasingly centrally directed and reliant upon subjective assessments of quality does not accord well with leading neoliberals' thought.
Is the much discussed populism that is emerging from the ruins of the neoliberal order simply a right-wing phenomenon, as it may seem given the prominence gained by the politics of hate of Trump and Le Pen?
(7) Fraser maintains that second-wave feminism's ultimate privileging of recognition (i.e identity claims) over redistribution (i.e economic justice) is responsible for the convergence of contemporary feminism with neoliberal capitalism.
They added: "The increase in inequality engendered by financial openness and austerity might itself undercut growth, the very thing that the neoliberal agenda is intent on boosting.
This conceptualisation presents an opportunity for more effective criticism of neoliberal policy.
Neoliberalism has its origins in the Mont Pelerin Society, which was formed by Austrian economist Friedrich von Hayek in 1947, and whose luminaries included other icons of neoliberal thought such as Ludwig von Mises and Milton Friedman.
MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE: HAYEK, FRIEDMAN, AND THE BIRTH OF NEOLIBERAL POLITICS
Although American neoliberals celebrated Milton Friedman's and George Stigler's famous 1946 essay attacking rent control, "Roofs or Ceilings?", rent control was, and remains, a minor, localized phenomenon here, while public housing--as Jones correctly notes--was aimed not at the middle class but at the poor.
Consider Jones' description of neoliberalism's evolution from the late 1940s to the '70s: "The early neoliberals were marked by their desire to move beyond both laissez-faire economics and the New Deal.
Friedrich Hayek, well known for the notion that socialism is 'the road to serfdom', founded the Mont Pelerin Society in 1947 in order to reconvene the neoliberal intellectuals and politicians.
According to William Robinson (2008) in Latin America and Global Capitalism, the past 40 years have witnessed Latin America's political-economic transformation as countries reject statist national development strategies in favor of reforms designed to facilitate global neoliberal integration.