Neo-Conservative

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Neo-Conservative

One who advocates an expansive foreign policy, as well as a role (though limited) for government in poverty reduction and welfare programs. Neo-conservatism is associated with nation building, in which a country uses its military force to occupy a country to protect a nascent government until it becomes stable. Neo-conservatives favor an activist foreign policy intended to prevent potential rivals from becoming a threat. Neo-conservatives believe this philosophy makes their own countries safer, while critics contend that their philosophy leads to instability.
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Over the Memorial Day weekend, neocon gad-fly and Weekly Standard editor William Kristol dropped his latest #NeverTrump salvo, another hint that he has found an "acceptable" Republican to head up a third-party, independent run for the White House.
But since the philosophy of neocons is predicated on grand visions, however destructive, it should come as no surprise that they are also promoting yet a new Middle East, which requires the dismantling of modern Iraq and Syria and the creation of a new country.
In a sense the 'Arab Spring' invigorated the neocons, but also reminded them of their political impotence.
Is it possible that the neocons can convince the U.
Neocons opposed government programs that undermined personal responsibility and community cohesion, but they supported those programs that reinforced them or that had no effect.
The neocons do not represent American public opinion.
The neocons had not planned for a difficult political transition.
Gazeta Wyborcza, the daily with the second-largest circulation, generally follows in the footsteps of the American neocon establishment and it supports PO.
By transforming the discussion of the desirability of confronting Middle Eastern autocracies into a parochial American bellyache about neocons versus anti-neocons, the polemicists have emptied it of everything interesting, for example disregarding how, during its second term, the Bush administration moved away from neocon tenets of the first term.
The Neocons are adept at shaping the reality of a discourse by placing their opponents in a general category of those in grievous error.
In They Knew They Were Right: The Rise of the Neocons, Jacob Heilbrunn, a senior editor at the conservative journal The National Interest, retraces the history of Podhoretz's movement through its wilderness years to its open embrace of the Republican Party and, post-Iraq, its ignominious decline.
Under Ronald Reagan, however, the neocons kept moving right and joined in a broad right-wing consensus, and by the 1990s it became hard to tell them apart from other Republicans.