Neo-Liberal

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Neo-Liberal

One who favors free trade, globalization, and openness to the free market. The term is used frequently in an international context, but it may also refer to the politics of a single country. Neo-liberals advocate floating exchange rates, the reduction or elimination of tariffs, privatization of nationalized companies, and similar practices. International organizations well-known for advocating neo-liberal policies include the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
SPANOS could water down his neo-liberal ideas in order to secure the backing of the commies in order to boost his chances.
Most American media coverage portrays the implementation of neo-liberal economic policies in a positive light.
American neo-liberals also based their market theories on 'negative liberty'.
The specific focus is on those employer associations which mobilised politically with the aim of transforming the Australian state and economy, particularly the arena of industrial relations, according to what are now recognised as neo-liberal principles of regulation.
The neo-liberal 'revolution' looms large in this book by Wilf Malcolm and Nicholas Tarling, chiefly because of the effect it had on New Zealand's universities.
In what may have seemed at the time "radical opposition" to the Keynesian management of aggregate demand, the neo-liberals advanced the notion of stimulating aggregate supply.
In this book he brings a fresh perspective to, and presents a brilliantly argued critique of, neo-liberal free-market ideologies.
In many countries, coalitions of landless farm workers, small family farmers and peasants have been central to national struggles against neo-liberal regimes and free trade policies.
The deep assumption of the neo-liberal global vision is that anything can be transferred without loss of content, and the idea that children can follow cars or food around the global production chain is currently moving from the margins to the centre of life.
According to Hansen, this shift in emphasis from a complex appreciation of the well-being of the community to a narrow actuarial understanding of economic behaviour reveals starkly the emergent neo-liberal understanding of the self and community.
The central value of neo-liberal globalisation is the notion of competition between nations, regions, companies and of course between individuals.
To give in to the notion that globalisation is an inevitable or inexorable process is not only to make a grave mistake of social analysis; it also lets the neo-liberals who have been driving it entirely off the hook.