Neo-Liberal

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Neo-Liberal

One who favors free trade, globalization, and openness to the free market. The term is used frequently in an international context, but it may also refer to the politics of a single country. Neo-liberals advocate floating exchange rates, the reduction or elimination of tariffs, privatization of nationalized companies, and similar practices. International organizations well-known for advocating neo-liberal policies include the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization.
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References in periodicals archive ?
During his first term in office, he remained loyal to the neo-liberal mantra amidst a downturn in the global economy following the financial crisis of 2007-9.
Overall, the South Korean industrial experience, similar to that of Japan in the earlier decades and replicated in a way in the case of China today, shows that a developmental state dedicated to the pursuit of full industrialization defies the neo-liberal dogma on getting the prices right.
American neo-liberals also based their market theories on 'negative liberty'.
(1) However, a notable feature of the business mobilisation during the period under examination, and one that forms part of this study, was the support provided by business to neo-liberal think-tanks and similar organisations.
The neo-liberal 'revolution' looms large in this book by Wilf Malcolm and Nicholas Tarling, chiefly because of the effect it had on New Zealand's universities.
The neo-liberals, in contrast, were in basic agreement with the Keynesians on the mechanics of prosperity: it was just a matter of devising the right policy mix, one that would stimulate investment rather than capital consumption and reward entrepreneurship rather than the expectation that income would be forthcoming no matter what.
In this book he brings a fresh perspective to, and presents a brilliantly argued critique of, neo-liberal free-market ideologies.
On the neo-liberal right, President da Silva of Brazil and his Agricultural Minister have provided massive resources to the agro-business export sector, relegating ecological, human rights, small farmer and landless worker demands to the lowest of priorities.
The deep assumption of the neo-liberal global vision is that anything can be transferred without loss of content, and the idea that children can follow cars or food around the global production chain is currently moving from the margins to the centre of life.
The central value of neo-liberal globalisation is the notion of competition between nations, regions, companies and of course between individuals.
The only country which approaches the free market doctrines of the Latin American neo-liberals is the Philippines -- the major development disaster in Asia.
The neo-realists' idea of power politics and the neo-liberals' idea of the world's globalisation are now less popular.