Neo-Liberalism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Neo-Liberalism

A political philosophy that favors free trade, globalization, and openness to the free market. The term is used frequently in an international context, but it may also refer to the politics of a single country. Neo-liberalism advocates floating exchange rates, the reduction or elimination of tariffs, privatization of nationalized companies, and similar practices. International organizations well-known for advocating neo-liberal policies include the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Davies, the market is not completely unregulated; it has its own policies, and has battled with politics throughout the history of neo-liberalism. To understand market power, he focusses on the Chicago School to exemplify monopoly and competition in the current market.
Neo-liberalism however is not at all confined to the economic sphere.
The post UN calls for global economic makeover to replace neo-liberalism appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Broadly understood, neo-liberalism describes a set of policies generally aimed at reducing the role of the state in the economy.
But Mubarak did not fail because of neo-liberalism, but because his regime neglected the redistribution of wealth and combating corruption and so on.
Indeed, the Anarchist Federation have an economic system to replace capitalist neo-liberalism. This is anarchocommunism or anarchosyndicalism whereby workers control the means of production, distribution and wealth collectively both in the workplace and community with full democracy.
Indeed, the Anarchist Federation have an economic system to replace capitalist neo-liberalism, whereby workers control the means of production, distribution and wealth collectively both in the workplace and community with full democracy.
In the documentary Occupy Love, writer-activist Naomi Klein describes the current late stage of neo-liberalism in horror film style as a "decentralized headless network that locks itself in and morphs and reaches into every aspect of our lives."
Apparently capitalism and neo-liberalism have elevated the market to a position of omnipotence as a spontaneously occurring best resources' distributor.
It is an open space of exchange between citizen organisations, associations, trade unions, non-governmental organisations, etc, from the world over to decry globalisation and neo-liberalism and advocate alterglobalism, a logic that favours such values as democracy, economic justice and environment protection.
The first, 'Making Thatcherism', has five essays which look at the 1970s and the new phenomenon's relations with neo-liberalism, monetarism and inflation, morality and religion, and Enoch Powell's prophetic warnings about massive immigration.