Natural Law

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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
claims of the other by asserting the invalidity of natural law per se to
Some ranchers cite natural law in various forms to claim vested
views collectively as "natural law ranch advocates."
natural law. (6) Such attributions rest primarily on the content and
which the natural law jurisprudence of Grotius and the Enlightenment
modern natural law theories of the Enlightenment will point to the
According to Suzanna Sherry, "The architects of our constitutional system assumed that appeals to natural law would continue despite the existence of a written Constitution." Supreme Court cases from 1789 until almost 1820 viewed cases from a natural justice angle as well as from the written Constitution.
It was also understood that civil law was simply a reflection of natural law. "Civil law was expected to adopt and enforce rules that approximated the constraints implied by natural law" (Hamburger 909).
Spooner's writings clearly demonstrate the basis for all of his legal disputes as a reflection of nineteenth-century natural law cognizance.
A natural law theory, in so far as it concerns human affairs, attempts to explain both what the natural law of human world is and why and how we ought to respect it.
Natural Law is one of the more difficult subjects that a person can encounter.
Marcus Twlius Eicero (106-43 B.C), the Roman stoic philosopher, said this concerning the natural law: