Natural Law

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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, although natural laws allow energy and matter to be created from quantum fluctuations, initial conditions and the existence of possible states also need to be taken into account.
This brilliant critical analysis is a prelude to Wolfe's defense of natural law liberalism.
There is one recommendation that Koch draws from nonlinear natural laws that ought to be a way of life and work for all of us: "Keep yourself and your firm humble, service-oriented, focused, lean, and hungry.
This rejection of natural law theory will not sit well with many of those whom Epstein calls libertarian absolutists.
These four frameworks are revealed law, natural law, utilitarianism, and what might be called Kantian liberalism.
Poets, James Elroy Flecker says, are those who swear that Beauty lives although lilies die; and the natural laws is the poetry of political science, the assurance that Justice lives though states are imperfect and ephemeral.
Natural laws contribution to normativity and law Bibliography
Chapter five gives "some account of the particulars" of the natural laws (B1, 66v).
He believed as well that individuals are endowed by God with a "moral sense" that enables them to apprehend the natural law and the "first principles of morality" (p.
43) He set out to trace the evolution of the concept of natural law from the theological idea of God as a lawgiver to its eventual application to nature as a scientific law.