Bias

(redirected from Natural bias)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Bias

1. In statistics, a circumstance leading to inaccurate results because of conscious or unconscious manipulation of data. Bias is anything that reduces the randomness of the sample being tested.

2. Anything that affects a decision other than facts. For example, a company may be disinclined to expand into an area of town because it is perceived as dangerous, whether or not it actually is. Bias is thought to reduce efficiency. See also: Behavioral economics.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the accent being more and more on women being seen as victims and not the person behind the vile act, a natural bias has thus developed for the fair sex.
It's a natural bias towards reporting things that might not have been out of the ordinary.
How do we move those who have a natural bias to what gets done, towards having a bias on how it gets done?
It seems that the natural bias, when there is uncertainty about an infection's cause, is to err on the side of prescribing antibiotics," he said.
The natural bias is for more power - 55 percent - to be delivered through the rear wheels to ensure a sporty response but the system can vary the split up to 70:30 either way when conditions dictate.
There was a natural bias towards the Scots players on show - Stephen McManus was described in what appeared gushing, almost awestruck tones of reverence at times, like a Beckenbauer of the Glens - and the most used words, apart from 'gol' were 'Rangers' and 'Celtic.
Family businesses are] more challenging because they have a natural bias toward family and generally a lack of objectivity in decision-making," he says.
The intimidatory presence of the block, which prevents players from playing with force directly towards an opponent's bowl to knock it out of a scoring position, and the narrow playing area, requires players to develop skill in using the natural bias on the bowls to bowl round the block.
The planning team members can have a natural bias and expertise in their area of specialty, such as the IT gurus, but may lack the facilities or mechanical knowledge to make fully informed decisions.