Natural Law

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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
The interpretation of the natural moral law has shaped much of moral theology after Vatican II.
Within the natural moral law, then, there is a principle of transcendence that is the rational and free nature of the person, and a principle of limit that is reason and freedom in nature.
So is there not a case for describing the founders' fundamental political theory not in terms of the social compact but in terms of natural moral law, natural rights, or natural equality and liberty?
21) It seems worthwhile to examine their thesis in the light of the documents which we have been reviewing, with a view to seeking some light on the disputed question regarding the nature and limits of this "secondary object" of infallibility--in particular whether it includes the norms of the natural moral law.
It reaffirms "the legitimate freedom of Catholic citizens to choose among the various political opinions that are compatible with faith and the natural moral law, and to select, according to their own criteria, what best corresponds to the needs of the common good.
Yet, though it is unlikely all the bishops will concur, perhaps most of them could join other religious leaders and their followers in issuing a statement based on natural moral law decrying that dictatorship of relativism imposed upon us by our neo-pagan style Supreme Court.
It does not challenge a specific moral teaching but the very competence of the church to teach authoritatively matters of natural moral law.
Pope John Paul II, and most recently Pope Benedict XVI, have written extensively and made great strides to try to get our bishops to climb aboard Peter's barque--for example, to censure Catholic politicians who politically reject natural moral law.
While the Pope has a duty to expound the fundamental principles of the natural moral law, it's up to legislators like McGuinty to translate those principles into state laws and public policy.
are not properly speaking matters of faith, but matters of the natural moral law that require nothing more than reason in order to be understood.
If there is no universal natural moral law written into the heart of man to which all are subject, then there is no ultimate authority above that of the State.