Natural Law


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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another facet of natural law is "the duty to seek the truth", as the basis for the maturation process of human person.
The theoretical framework of natural law was pervasive in colonial America, and it was firmly embedded in the broader tradition of British constitutionalism.
Thus, for example, after it was established that private property was permitted by natural law (despite biblical references to holding property in common), there was no question but that forms of ownership and use should be regulated for the public good.
Not even their parents see the reasonableness of this natural law teaching.
Adam and Eve's breach of this covenant put the eschatological new creation out of the reach of sinful humanity, which set the stage for the Noahic covenant, which, it seems fair to say, is the hinge on which VanDrunen's entire biblical theology of the natural law turns.
Moreover, natural laws allow nearly infinitely many universes to exist, and they can explain why our universe seems to be fine tuned.
Annabel Brett's book is an accomplished study of the contested boundaries between "nature" and the "city" in early modern natural law discourse.
But my mission is to raise a little skepticism about the contours of natural law and perhaps to suggest some caution.
Here the view of Marvin Fox (according to whom the concept of natural law does not exist in Judaism) is opposed with the opinion of David Novak.
It is a "narrow" law with only "limited applications," but it is a natural law, nonetheless, the court stated.
The Limits of Ethics in International Relations: Natural Law, Natural Rights, and Human Rights in Transition.
Wieland is useful in showing how an "autonomistic" interpretation of Aquinas's doctrine of natural law is tainted by Kantianism.

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