Nation

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Related to Nations: United Nations

Nation

A group of persons with a common identity completely separate from other groups. There is no consensus as to what separates a nation from, say, an ethnic group beyond wide acceptance of a group's identity as a nation. Many nations also have their own states or countries, though most countries are multinational.
References in classic literature ?
So far, therefore, as either designed or accidental violations of treaties and the laws of nations afford JUST causes of war, they are less to be apprehended under one general government than under several lesser ones, and in that respect the former most favors the SAFETY of the people.
Besides, it is well known that acknowledgments, explanations, and compensations are often accepted as satisfactory from a strong united nation, which would be rejected as unsatisfactory if offered by a State or confederacy of little consideration or power.
The wars of these two last-mentioned nations have in a great measure grown out of commercial considerations, -- the desire of supplanting and the fear of being supplanted, either in particular branches of traffic or in the general advantages of trade and navigation, and sometimes even the more culpable desire of sharing in the commerce of other nations without their consent.
May He not have over-ruled their designs, and founded for us a nation by them?
And it was still an unsolved problem whether or not the United States could be kept united, whether or not it could be built into an organic nation without losing the spirit of self-help and democracy.
All the Western nations, and some few of the Eastern, were represented.
They run, one, two, three, and me, and make go in the canoe; my nation have no canoe that time.
Let us unite in ardent supplication to the Founder of nations and the Builder of worlds, that what then was prophecy may continue unfolding into history--that the dearest hopes of the human race may not be extinguished in disappointment, and that the last may prove the noblest empire of time.
In its incorruptible flow all round the globe of the earth it preserves from the decay and forgetfulness of death the greatness of our great men, and amongst them the passionate and gentle greatness of Nelson, the nature of whose genius was, on the faith of a brave seaman and distinguished Admiral, such as to "Exalt the glory of our nation.
We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that this nation might live.
In two or three little centuries it had converted a nation of men to a nation of worms.
As a nation grows and changes, its literature grows and changes with it.