Nationalist

(redirected from Nationalists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Nationalists: nationalism, Ultranationalists

Nationalist

One who promotes the interests of one's own country or ethnic group over others. For example, nationalism may advocate secession of a region to form a new country in which one's own ethnic group predominates. What qualifies as a "nation" in nationalist terms is a matter of some disagreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Magsi suggested that the political struggle for rights of peasants and labourers should feature in nationalist politics, which has hitherto remained focused on the rights of Sindhi people.
In India, it were the many Congress governments which, between 1947 and 1990, molded the Indian nationalist narrative.
In the wake of Catalonia's recent independence referendum, Corsican nationalists have downplayed any ambitions for secession, saying the island lacked the demographic and economic clout of the Spanish region.
It is only with a strong nationalist commitment that we can build strong our capability to defend our nation.
Meyers used his "Closer Look" segment to break down the controversy surrounding Donald Trump's campaign listing white nationalist and former KKK member William Johnson as a delegate from California for the GOP convention.
It looks particularly peculiar when nationalists who claim to love the homeland so dearly have little regard for its beauties.
ALDE President Guy Verhofstadt declared that the worst possible outcome of the ongoing coalition talks in Bulgaria would be a cabinet with the participation of nationalist formations like the Patriotic Front and the Ataka party.
Our world will continue to be a very dangerous place until nationalists can begin to think internationally, and seek to share civilised values with other nations.
In addition to launching propaganda campaigns through social media, the Baloch nationalists are organizing protest rallies at important world capitals in front of iconic buildings to propagate their stance.
Hence the 19th and beginning of 20th centuries are usually identified as the heyday of nationalist movements, whereas much of the 20th and the beginning of this century are analysed through the prism of apparently more universalist ideologies: liberalism, socialism, conservatism, religious fundamentalism, anarchism, fascism or racism.
Hindu nationalists also developed the political ideology of Hindutva, articulated particularly by Savarkar in 1923 in his book 'Hindutva or Who is a Hindu?
However, dissident nationalists still stage sporadic gun and bomb attacks, which have intensified in the past four years as frustration with the power-sharing government established under the 1998 deal has grown in parts of the nationalist community.