Nationalism


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Nationalism

The philosophy in which one promotes the interests of one's own country or ethnic group over others. For example, nationalism may advocate secession of a region to form a new country in which one's own ethnic group predominates. What qualifies as a "nation" in nationalist terms is a matter of some disagreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nationalism is being treated like a private domain of those in power and those who claim that they are patriots, and they consider those who do not toe their line as traitors and anti-nationals.
It will be argued that although they are useful and offer certain insights, their explanation of why contemporary Chinese news discourses have to strongly encourage nationalism is parochial.
Far from "abandoning their existing American national identities," for example, "southern nationalists were attempting to define a new nation within the parameters of the old, striving to render the sacred remembrance of American nationalism's 'golden age' specifically southern" (83).
But Nelson's attempt to salvage a non-racist baby from the nationalist bath-water is, in my view, an impossible enterprise: strip nationalism of its racist elements and what is left is socialism.
The most important chapter in this book is Chapter Three, in which Lai explores the concept of nationalism and its evolution in Japan.
The new "Muslim nationalism," on the other hand, envisages a future shaped "by an imperial Ottoman past overlaid onto a republican state framework" and "everything from lifestyles to public and foreign policy reinterpreted not necessarily according to Islamic law, but Islamic ethics and imagery." While the "old Turks" celebrate the opening of the Grand National Assembly in 1920 and the founding of the republic in 1923, the "new Turks" celebrate Holy Birth (of Prophet Muhammad) Week and the Ottoman Muslim conquest of Christian Byzantium in 1453.
Behind economic nationalism in motion is a particular kind of state-business nexus where the two operate in a public-private partnership.
The caustic responses of West Indians to such biased writings provide the foundation of Creole nationalism.
After a deft survey of the literature on nationalism, interspersed with thoughtful reflections on competing nationalisms in Asia and Europe, in chapter two Reid narrows his focus and builds a case for a distinctive Southeast Asian experience in which different forms of nationalism have blossomed and taken shape.
Loewenstein and Stevens's collection is divided into five overlapping sections, each dealing with a different aspect of Milton's nationalism. The first part examines Milton's political nationalism: the relationship between his revolutionary politics and his idea of the nation as a self-determining assembly of free people (10).
The caustic responses of West Indians to such biased writings provide the foundation of Creole nationalism. Both the third and fifth chapters focused on two influential personalities from Trinidad and Tobago: CLR James and Eric Williams.
There is no absolute or objective criterion - or criteria - on which nationalism in general or state-nationalism in particular can be grounded.