National Health Service

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National Health Service

Most commonly called the NHS. The collective name for the publicly-funded health care systems in the United Kingdom. The governments of Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales operate their NHS systems independently, while the UK government controls the NHS in England. Each NHS system is funded entirely by the government and provides most services free of charge for patients. Critics contend that the NHS is too expensive for taxpayers and that inefficiency has led to long wait times for medical care. However, it has remained popular among many people in the UK.
References in periodicals archive ?
Data from foreign governments with these systems contradict many of the claims made about national health insurance by supporters in the US.
It's estimated that a national health information network could save about $140 billion a year through improved care and reduced duplication of medical tests, Thompson said.
Mr Blair said: "I think people get absolutely fed up with those who continually run down the National Health Service."
Quentin Young, national coordinator of Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), says, "What's striking is not the high level of public support for reform; our system's been in critical condition for years.
The survey revealed that 52% of physicians were aware that their colleagues supported national health insurance.
If physicians across the country hold views similar to those in Massachusetts, it could start a renewed push for national health insurance, the investigators said.
Little is known about Roosevelt's personal views on the issue of national health insurance.
His basic assumption is that the goals of medicine are the heart of the problem, and it is because the overarching goal is increasingly a technological perfectionism that national health plans will fail.
However, not until the last few years has national health care reform become the focus of intense analysis, discussion, and debate.
Rose and her colleagues used data from the National Health Examination Survey of 1960 and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 1976 to 1980.
We need a national health program that guarantees universal access to comprehensive care while containing costs and minimizing ad ministrative interference in the practice of medicine.
This time, congressional skepticism of the health-care plan--developed by a team national health experts led by first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton--has been bipartisan.

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