Nanometer

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Nanometer

A measure of length equal to one one-billionth of a meter. In other words, a nanometer is .000000001 meters. Nanometers are important in the semiconductor industry.
References in periodicals archive ?
MoS2 can also be scaled down to atomically thin sheets, about 0.65 nanometers thick, with a lower dielectric constant, a measure reflecting the ability of a material to store energy in an electric field.
The resulting errors caused measurements to be off by a few nanometers. "This is the first experimental proof that under some reasonable operating conditions these cantilevers can oscillate chaotically, Raman says.
As one report concludes, "It should be remembered that substantial parts of the cell wall structure engineered during traditional pulping, bleaching and fiber processing are in the nanometer range."
CoolTime shares a common platform with Sequence's PhysicalStudio for pre- and post-route optimization of timing and signal integrity, thereby enabling fast and accurate design closure for nanometer SoC designs.
It will be implemented in a 90 nanometer copper/SOI process and made in Fujitsu's fabs in Japan.
The problem addressed by the new method is particularly acute when nanometer scale dimensional uncertainties are required: a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image is a distorted representation of the feature.
For example, blue light has a wavelength of 400 to 450 nanometers, yellow light is about 575 nanometers and red light is about 650 to 760 nanometers.
Nanotechnology is defined as the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through the control of matter at a scale of 1-100 nanometers, as well as the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena developed at that scale.
The far ultraviolet (FUV) imager: images the ultraviolet aurora produced by the electron bombardment of oxygen (135.6 nanometers) and nitrogen (140--190 nanometers) and by energetic protons (121.8 nanometers).
IBM Researchers and other semiconductor experts predict that while challenging, semiconductors show promise to scale from today's 22 nanometers down to 14 and then 10 nanometers in the next several years.
Before this experiment, this limit was at about 20 nanometers," DESY researcher Dr.
Stanford researchers have found a new way to trap particles smaller than 10 nanometers -- and potentially down to just a few atoms in size -- which until now have escaped light's grasp.