Nanometer


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Nanometer

A measure of length equal to one one-billionth of a meter. In other words, a nanometer is .000000001 meters. Nanometers are important in the semiconductor industry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ye also said that further size reductions beyond 14 nanometers and additional performance improvements are likely not possible using silicon, meaning new designs and materials will be needed to continue progress.
After depositing gold wires only 10 to 15 nanometers thick on a microchip, the scientists found that driving large currents through the wires for about 2 minutes would scour away enough gold to form gaps, on average, about 1 nm across.
That is a boon when the gate is 5 nanometers or longer.
The world s No.2 NAND flash memory maker behind Samsung Electronics Co has already ordered chip-making equipment from ASML to produce microchips with circuitry widths of less than 25 nanometers, the Nikkei said.
The 65 nanometer process is the most advanced lithographic node for manufacturing semiconductors in large volumes today and provides significant benefits over 90nm and 130nm processes by enabling lower power consumption, smaller size, higher yields and higher levels of integration.
The chips offer a circuitry of 65 nanometers wide, which is around 1,000 times thinner than a human hair, compared to its current chips which offer 90 nanometer circuitry.
The 'Nanologue' programme has created a so-called 'nanometer', am online tool, which a European Commission note says is designed to help "researchers and product developers identify areas which could raise ethical, environmental or societal concerns among future consumers." It involves 18 questions divided into seven sections, covering issues such as health and the environment, social benefits, resource requirements, privacy and transparency, all of which could raise concern about nanotechnology.
Literature details the company's latest series of non-contact laser-based industrial gauging sensors with a 10 nanometer resolution range using specular reflective triangulation measurement principles.
As one report concludes, "It should be remembered that substantial parts of the cell wall structure engineered during traditional pulping, bleaching and fiber processing are in the nanometer range."
The problem with thermotunneling diodes is that in order for electrons to undergo the quantum physics effect of thermo-tunneling that generates electricity, the two surfaces involved must be consistently held about one nanometer apart without touching.
The 1.35GHz versions of the Sparc64 V chips are implemented in a 130 nanometer copper process and are made by Fujitsu's chip labs in Japan.