National Labor Relations Board

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National Labor Relations Board

Also called the NLRB. An agency of the U.S. federal government that monitors union elections and guards against unfair labor practices such as featherbedding or employer discrimination against union members. It also serves as an administrative court for labor disputes. The NLRB consists of five members, appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate to a five-year term. It was established by executive order in 1934.
References in periodicals archive ?
100) This Note concerns the test the NLRB uses to determine whether these protections should extend to charter-school employee unions.
So, the effort to clean up the leakage caused by the NLRB's Murphy Oil decision appears to have begun within the NLRB itself, laying the groundwork for a bigger battle that most certainly lies ahead.
To conserve resources, the NLRB set jurisdictional requirements that must be met for employers to be subject to the NLRA.
That appeal was filed on the basis that the NLRB does not have rulemaking authority, the plaintiffs' First Amendment claims, and their ongoing challenge to the NLRB's recess appointments.
But the NLRB states that it has "chosen not to assert [its] jurisdiction over very small employers whose annual volume of business is not large enough to have more than a slight effect on interstate commerce.
The Boeing lawsuit was followed by NLRB publication of a suite of proposed rules on June 22 seeking about a dozen modifications to procedures governing union representation elections, effectively compressing the time frame between a union's filing of a representation petition and a representation election.
The NLRB is attempting to determine in what state a company like Boeing or Caterpillar can and can't do business.
Hall said language in the NLRB memo may help define the appropriate scope for a bargaining unit.
In denouncing the NLRB decision, American Nurses Association President Rebecca M.
According to AGMA executive director Alan Gordon, they were the only dancers to testify before the NLRB at the union's request, although six others were subpoenaed.
That all changed in November 2000, when the NLRB granted graduate students at NYU and other private institutions the right to form unions, overturning a 20-year-old precedent.
And according to the National Labor Relations Board, or NLRB, this means that employers may not forbid workers from discussing wages and other working conditions.