NIMBY


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

NIMBY

A derogatory term; an acronym for “not in my backyard.” It is intended to convey the sense that people are generally in favor of socially desirable programs such as half-way houses for felons, or unsavory but largely necessary uses such as waste disposal sites, as long as they are located in or near someone else's neighborhood.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Offshore wind developments in the NIMBY scenario are also subject to public objections based on visual impact.
NIMBY movements attempt to mobilize support for their informal policing of physical boundaries through boundary making in discourse.
Keywords: NIMBY, land-use planning and environmental disputes, quality of life, healthy communities, collaborative planning
Developed by Napa's Balzac Communications, the Not In My Backyard (or NIMBY) campaign takes a humorous approach to education, rather than boring the public into an apathetic stupor with ultra-serious pamphlets and public service announcements.
Since the average wind turbine can prevent the emission of 1,500 tons of carbon dioxide each year, with vast environmental benefits, I'm appalled at the NIMBY opposition to projects like Cape Wind in Massachusetts.
It is quite common for group homes of all sorts to spark opposition from residents before they open, but this is the only known NIMBY campaign against a battered women's shelter.
Bibby told the leaders they can no longer cater to NIMBY (not in my backyard) opposition to apartments if they want to create vibrant, livable communities.
NIMBY ("not in my back yard") reactions show us that people are concerned about things that pollute close to home.
In Nimby, 2002, for example, a flotilla of frostinglike daubs (recalling Philip Guston) hovers over a landslide of wavering lines (shades of Brice Marden).
Issues that can crop up when looking at building or expanding on a site include the following: zoning; a NIMBY ("not in my backyard") reaction from neighboring property owners; accessibility; traffic; environmental issues; the distance to consuming markets; local, state and federal regulations; and the use of setbacks and other property visibility concerns.