National Bureau of Economic Research

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National Bureau of Economic Research

A private organization that conducts research into how the American economy works. Its goal is to provide non-partisan analysis to policymakers, businesspersons, academics, and the wider public. NBER divides its research into four main components: the development of new ways to make statistical measurements, estimating quantitative data on economic behavior, researching possible effects of policy proposals, and researching the effects of policy alternatives. It is particularly well-known for chronicling the beginning and end dates of American recessions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Waugh, New York University and NBER, "Redistributing the Gains from Trade through Progressive Taxation"
Ethan Lieber, University of Notre Dame, and Lee Lockwood, University of Virginia and NBER, "Targeting with In-kind Transfers: Evidence from Medicaid Home Care"
German Gutierrez, New York University, and Thomas Philippon, New York University and NBER, "Declining Competition and Investment in the U.
Thibault Fally, University of California, Berkeley and NBER, and James E.
Damon Jones, University of Chicago and NBER, and Ioana Marinescu, University of Pennsylvania and NBER, "The Labor Market Impacts of Universal and Permanent Cash Transfers: Evidence from the Alaska Permanent Fund"
Paul Milgrom, Stanford University, and Steven Tadelis, University of California, Berkeley and NBER, "Market Design"
Emmanuel Farhi, Harvard University and NBER, and David Baqaee, London School of Economics, "The Macroeconomic Impact of Microeconomic Shocks: Beyond Hulten's Theorem" (NBER Working Paper No.
Pablo Fajgelbaum, University of California, Los Angeles, and NBER, and Edouard Schaal, CREI (Barcelona), "Optimal Transport Networks in Spatial Equilibrium" (NBER Working Paper No.
Durlauf, University of Wisconsin-Madison and NBER, and Ananth Seshadri, University of Wisconsin-Madison, "Understanding the Great Gatsby Curve"
Efraim Benmelech, Carola Frydman, and Dimitris Papanikolaou, Northwestern University and NBER, "Financial Frictions and Employment during the Great Depression" (NBER Working Paper No.
Tano Santos, Columbia University and NBER, and Pietro Veronesi, University of Chicago and NBER, "Habits and Leverage" (NBER Working Paper No.
Anusha Chari, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and NBER, and Karlye Stedman and Christian Lundblad, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, "Taper Tantrums: QE, Its Aftermath, and Emerging Market Capital Flows"