National Bureau of Economic Research

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National Bureau of Economic Research

A private organization that conducts research into how the American economy works. Its goal is to provide non-partisan analysis to policymakers, businesspersons, academics, and the wider public. NBER divides its research into four main components: the development of new ways to make statistical measurements, estimating quantitative data on economic behavior, researching possible effects of policy proposals, and researching the effects of policy alternatives. It is particularly well-known for chronicling the beginning and end dates of American recessions.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Aleksandar Andonov, University of Amsterdam; Roman Kraussl, University of Luxembourg; and Joshua Rauh, Stanford University and NBER, "The Subsidy to Infrastructure as an Asset Class" (NBER Working Paper No.
* Sumit Agarwal, Georgetown University; John Grigsby, University of Chicago; Ali Hortacsu, University of Chicago and NBER; Gregor Matvos, University of Texas at Austin and NBER; Amit Seru, Stanford University and NBER; and Vincent Yao, Georgia State University, "Searching for Approval"
* Michael Geruso, University of Texas at Austin and NBER; Timothy Layton and Mark Shepard, Harvard University and NBER, and Grace McCormack, Harvard University, "The Two Margin Problem in Insurance Markets"
* Tarek Alexander Hassan, Boston University and NBER; Stephan Hollander, Tilburg University; Laurence van Lent, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management; and Ahmed Tahoun, London Business School, "Firm-Level Political Risk: Measurement and Effects" (NBER Working Paper No.
* Koichiro Ito, University of Chicago and NBER, and Shuang Zhang, University of Colorado Boulder, "Setting the Price Right: Evidence from Heating Price Reform in China"
* Prottoy Akbar and Sijie Li, University of Pittsburgh, and Allison Shertzer and Randall Walsh, University of Pittsburgh and NBER, "Racial Segregation in Housing Markets and the Erosion of Black Wealth"
Kowalski, University of Michigan and NBER, "Behavior within a Clinical Trial and Implications for Mammography Guidelines" (NBER Working Paper No.
* Rodrigo Adao, University of Chicago and NBER; Michal Kolesar, Princeton University; and Eduardo Morales, Princeton University and NBER, "Shift-Share Designs: Theory and Inference" (NBER Working Paper No.
* Michael Sockin, University of Texas at Austin, and Wei Xiong, Princeton University and NBER, "A Model of Cryptocurrencies"
List and Magne Mogstad, University of Chicago and NBER, "Demand for Leisure and Flexible Work Arrangements"
Mian, Princeton University and NBER, and Amir Sufi, University of Chicago and NBER, "Credit Supply and Housing Speculation" (NBER Working Paper No.
* Susan Athey, Stanford University and NBER; Zakary Campbell, Brown University; Eric Chyn, University of Virginia; Justine S.