National Best Bid and Offer

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National Best Bid and Offer

An SEC regulation stating that brokers are required to seek the best possible price for their customers. This means that brokers may not find less favorable prices in order to extract a higher commission. See also: Fiduciary Responsibility.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(51.) The NBBO consists of the national best bid (NBB) and national best offer (NBO), which are the highest bid and lowest offer quotes available for a given security across all public trading venues.
We use daily millisecond TAQ data to calculate the NBBO and follow Goyenko, Holden, and Trzcinka (2009) and estimate price impacts using the following equations:
As a result, if we use the quote of Chicago Stock Exchange to construct NBBO for the whole day, the market can be crossed for 80% of the time during that day.
(57.) See LEWIS, supra note 1, at 97-98 (stipulating consequences of NBBO requirement and how it unintentionally accommodated front-running by high-frequency traders).
makers display and continuously update the NBBO for listed securities.
The two most important business opinion surveys in New Zealand are the Quarterly Survey of Business Opinion (QSBO) published by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER), and the monthly National Bank Business Outlook (NBBO) survey.
Indeed, many investors are not even aware that it is possible to improve upon the NBBO (National Best Bid and Offer) prices -- the prices that are posted publicly and disseminated by the securities markets (and reproduced in such places as the Wall Street Journal and online quotation services).
Problems with the NBBO: It's not the Best Bid or the Best Offer
This empowers users to intelligently source additional liquidity beyond what is displayed on the National Best Bid and Offer (NBBO).
Be at or better than the National Best Bid and Offer (NBBO) for 25% of the trading day for 500 shares;
Mellon Securities was responsible for executing orders on behalf of Mellon Investor Services (MIS), an administrator and transfer agent, but routinely deprived many among MIS's 700+ plan clients of best execution by executing their orders at stale or inferior prices -- often outside the US National Best Bid and Offer (NBBO) -- in cross trades that gave better prices to hedge fund clients.