NATO

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NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization. A military alliance originally designed to deter against potential Soviet invasion. Members pledge mutual defense; that is, an attack on one is considered an attack on all. Since the end of the Cold War, NATO has been involved in other military engagement, notably in the Balkans and Afghanistan. Members include the United States and a number of European countries. It was founded in 1949 and is based in Brussels.
References in periodicals archive ?
* What kind of cooperation should be established between Russia and NATO after NATO expansion?
So anyone who thought Germany might cite recent events as vindication of its opposition to further Nato expansion at the organisation's last summit in Bucharest may have been surprised to hear Chancellor Angela Merkel assuring Georgia that it would become a member of Nato if it wished to.
NATO Expansion and Treaty Adaptation In January 1994, NATO had established the "Partnership for Peace"--seen as a first step to NATO membership.
"NATO expansion is the Titanic of American foreign policy, and the iceberg on which it will founder is Baltic membership," he said.
23, the Russian parliament approved a resolution authorizing the devising of a program to counteract NATO expansion. The ratification of SALT II has been stalled, and progress towards SALT III has been slowed.
Success or failure of result, in other words--whether in the policy or the operational realm; whether in Haiti, in Bosnia, or at Aberdeen Proving Ground; whether concerned with NATO expansion, Gulf War syndrome, or the treatment of homosexuals--may bear little direct relationship to the quality of advice that precedes action (or inaction).
NATO expansion has bipartisan support in the Congress, including the support of key members like Senators Jesse Helms and Joseph Biden.
Thus responsibility for NATO expansion falls squarely with the Clinton administration.
If Lithuania is excluded from the first NATO expansion, it would need political and psychological reassurance, perhaps in the form of a different commitment such as associate membership status.
Russian President Vladimir Putin has seen NATO expansion in Central and Eastern Europe as a threat to his sphere of influence.
Moscow sees NATO expansion towards its borders as aggressive and a violation of post-Cold War agreements.
Nato expansion "is a continuation of the old logic of the Cold War," he said.

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