NAB Code

NAB Code

A voluntary code for decency in advertising used by the National Association of Broadcasters until the 1980s. It promoted and discouraged content; for example, adherents agreed not to air advertisements for liquor.
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In April 1975, the National Association of Broadcasters ("NAB") responded to the growing concern about television content by announcing a family viewing policy, which it incorporated into the NAB Code of Conduct for Television.
In 1983, the Department of Justice brought suit against the NAB, challenging the NAB Code on antitrust grounds.
If a television advertisement did not meet the standards of the NAB Code, the advertisement did not run on NAB member stations.
Although these studies provide important insights into television clearance procedures, the studies examined advertising review practices of more than 10 years ago (1986 and 1988) when the 1982 NAB Code was still well remembered by television station owners and managers.
Rotfeld, Abernethy, and Parsons (1990) found that stations more closely following the 1982 NAB Code rejected significantly more advertising submissions.
Through a limited antitrust exemption, the Children's Protection Act would enable companies to either revive the old NAB code or formulate and implement a new code.
the three similar codes incorporated many aspects from the NAB code (Maddox and Zanot 1984) and have been seen to carry an influence akin to that previously held by the NAB.
Respondents also claimed to follow the defunct NAB code more closely than either the AAF (t = 11.
They may feel a need to say they follow the NAB code to show that renewed FCC regulations are not needed.
It focuses primarily on the experience with the NAB Code and the CARU Guidelines since they are most closely related to the proposals to use self-regulation for digital television (DTV) and privacy on the Internet.
Enough stations complied with the NAB Code that Father Coughlin found it difficult to find outlets and eventually went off the air in 1940.
The NAB codes were subsequently eliminated because of U.