Mustard Gas


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Mustard Gas

A chemical made from sulfur that causes blisters on human skin. It has been used in chemical warfare since World War I. See also: Chemical Weapons Convention.
References in periodicals archive ?
While working with Dow Chemical, Albert Smith received a letter from Major William McPherson at Edgewood, which stated that General Pershing wanted 1,000 tons of mustard gas.
Numbers have since soared from the lingering, and unanticipated, effects of mustard gas.
Plaintiffs, individuals of Kurdish descent that were either victims of the mustard gas attacks or family members of deceased victims, asserted claims against Alcolac under the Alien Tort Statute ("ATS").
Boyer, the hospital can handle just about any poisoning or chemical weapon injury, even one like the New Bedford mustard gas victim, that hadn't been seen in this country in six years.
A World War II shell was disabled at Whiteford Sands by Army bomb disposal experts, two of whom later needed hospital treatment after suffering mustard gas exposure symptoms.
During World War II, thousands of tonnes of mustard gas was produced at the Valley Works, Rhydymwyn, near Mold.
It was 4 pm on March 17, 1988 when Iraqi planes dropped eight mustard gas bombs over the wood-beamed stone houses of Nowdesheh, nestled in a green horseshoe valley near the border.
Sulphur mustard (SM), commonly known as mustard gas and chemically, bis [2-chloroethyl] sulphide is an alkylating agent that causes serious blisters upon contact with human skin.
officials recently discovered that possibly thousands of mustard gas containers may have been contaminated by mercury, and the Army now must find ways to prevent the mercury from being released into the atmosphere when the mustard is destroyed.
Saddam was a great guy to the Americans when he was compliant and his requests for mustard gas and all sorts of weapons were supplied.
Remediation specialist Code has won a million pound contract to clean up a former mustard gas factory near Bristol.
Naranjo, a Vietnam veteran who became a renowned sculptor; Alfred Pugh, a 108-year-old World War I veteran who suffered lifelong disabilities resulting from mustard gas exposure during the Meusse-Argonne offensive; and Felecia Weston, a Gulf War veteran wounded in a SCUD missile attack who has dedicated herself to helping other disabled veterans as a DAV National Service Officer.