Mullah

(redirected from Muslim clergy)
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Mullah

A Muslim who is religiously educated. Some mullahs are experts in Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to the Orthodox and Muslim clergy, who had gained mainly secondary religious education, the Catholic clergy had members with a university degree and knowledge of several foreign languages.
63) A further possible reason for the hardening of policy at this time is that, with the successful conclusion of the land and water reforms in Central Asia, the Bolsheviks no longer needed the support of the Muslim clergy.
His cabinet has also delayed discussion of a proposal to prevent Muslim clergy inside Israel from announcing prayers by loudspeakers.
churches to invite Jewish and Muslim clergy to their sanctuaries to read from sacred texts next month in an initiative designed to counter anti-Muslim bigotry.
Veiled Muslim women demonstrated carrying crucifixes, alongside their Christian sisters who raised copies of the Koran above their heads; while Muslims, including President Hosni Mubarak's eldest son Alaa and his wife, as well as Prime Minister Ahmad Nazeef and Muslim clergy, attended the midnight mass on Coptic Christmas (6/7 January) in churches across the country.
While such a project may still be years away, excitement surrounding the idea for a Muslim American seminary reflects a growing need to train Muslim clergy well-versed in traditional texts and with an understanding of the American context in which they would work.
This approach contradicted the earlier imperial policy of creating officially supported hierarchies for the Muslim clergy.
This technique was later imitated by the religious movement led by Khomeini with the help of Muslim clergy secret networks.
Turkey's government-run religious high schools are tasked by law to educate preachers and other Muslim clergy, but many regard them as a breeding ground for Islamist political movements.
The court ruled that religious identity is a matter for Muslim clergy, who are unlikely to approve apostasy.
Where were the outraged Muslims when the Muslim clergy issued a death threat against Salman Rushdie for writing a book questioning certain tenets of their religion?
Such is life in the Islamic Republic of Iran, where 68 million Iranians are now subject to near total social and political domination by the all-powerful Shi'a Muslim clergy that controls the state's central power structures.
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